PEOPLE

MARSHA BOULTON April 27 1981

PEOPLE

MARSHA BOULTON April 27 1981

PEOPLE

MARSHA BOULTON

They laughed when a wild-eyed Welshman set out to convince Edmonton that its ugly duckling High-Level bridge could be turned into a 64-metre waterfall, 15 metres higher than Horseshoe Falls at Niagara. It took him more than two years, but Edmonton artist Peter Lewis recruited 600 people and almost $1 million and, last summer, the water started cascading. Now Lewis is off on another big art project—the lighting of 45,000 bonfires around North America in the shape of a peace dove. For starters, Lewis has begun collecting maps that will be cut and pasted into a 60-metre-long key to where the bonfires will go. Then there’s the job of enlisting an army of 45,000 people to light the sawdust or natural gas canister fires so the image can blaze out on Christmas Day, 1983. “I’ll raise the people. Make no mistake on that,” says Lewis, who is off soon to garner support from such as Canadian Chamber of Commerce head Stan Roberts and astronomer Carl Sagan. Says Lewis confidentially: “I have a knack for doing stuff.” A knack, too, for symbolism. The dove will stretch from Arkansas to Northern Ontario, Bonavista to Vancouver Island, with its tail in the East and the olive branch stretching from Vancouver to the Rockies.

BRIAN WILLER / MACLEAN'S

Joe McCarthy was the greatest ally the KGB has ever had,” says film producer William Macadam, whose CBC special The KGB Connections on May 3 will be showing daggers behind some surprising cloaks. Riding on the success of the 1977 Connections series on organized crime in Canada, an investigative team headed by director Martyn Burke scoured the continent to unearth enough material to engage both Canadian and U.S. audiences. “McCarthyism became such a bad word that journalists have tended only to look at Allied intelligence forces and shy "away from the activities of the KGB,” says Macadam. “They are definitely operating among us—and in large numbers.”

Political analyst Dalton Camp may be noted for his readiness to take centre stage, but the spotlight may soon be moving to another Camp—his 26-year-old daughter Cherie. With a CBC broadcast recording soon to get air play and an album in the works, the younger Camp is becoming a favorite in Canadian pop and jazz music circles. Noted for her gutsy stylings on her own material as well as the time-honored favorites, Camp has already logged time singing backup for pop singers Charity Brown and Ron Perreault on vinyl. Although trying to make it on her own name, Camp says her father, as fan, can be found in the audience any time the two are in the same city. "He's very supportive, he likes my hurtin" songs."

It was a powerful and dramatic story that 26-year-old Janet Cooke, a reporter for The Washington Post, told in JIMMY’S WORLD, the confessions of an eight-year-old heroin addict. So powerful, in fact, that Cooke won American journalism’s most prestigious award, the Pulitzer Prize. But, a little more than 24 hours after she had been honored, Cooke had an even more astonishing confession of her own —she had made the entire story up, thus hoodwinking the Pulitzer committee for the first time in its 64-year history, and gulling newspapers and magazines across the continent, including Maclean’s. In biographical material Cooke submitted to the Pulitzer jury, she claimed to be a magna cum laude graduate of Vassar College with a master’s degree from the University of Toledo. After the announcement of her prize, however, Vassar officials revealed Cooke had dropped out after her freshman year and the University of Toledo reported she had earned a BA not an MA. Disturbed by these inconsistencies, Post editorial brass, some of whom had already questioned the authenticity of JIMMY’S WORLD, grilled Cooke about her sources. At first she maintained she had promised, under threat of death, not to reveal the true identities of the eight-year-old addict and his family. Still, when she was unable to identify the house that she had described as Jimmy’s home, Cooke broke down and admitted her lie. Ironically, one of her interrogators was Washington Post metropolitan editor Bob Woodward of Watergate fame, who rose to national prominence on the revelations of the most famous anonymous source in recent history—Deep Throat.

In all of the hoopla surrounding Prince Charles and Lady Diana Spen-z cer’s impending royal nuptials, the^ plight of pregnant Princess Anne has^ hardly been considered. In an interview shown on British television last week, the princess indicated that, despite the royal flurry of activity, her life shows few signs of romance or glamor. “There is a limit to how interesting a 40-acre field can be,” opined the princess, whose husband, Capt. Mark Phillips, considers himself a working farmer as co-owner of the couple’s 700-acre estate. After describing herself as the “slave labor around the place,” the 30-year-old royal daughter turned her sights on motherhood, as she prepares for the birth of her second child next month. While Lady Di may be anxious to rival the nine-member brood of Queen Victoria, Anne admits to being “not particularly maternal.” Taking her disgruntlement one step further, Anne proclaimed pregnancy an “occupational hazard of being a wife.”

Not-so-dumb-blonde Suzanne Somers may not have achieved her $150,000 per episode plus percentage salary requirement on Three's Company, but she did manage a release from the show and “freedom from negativity.” Next on the agenda orchestrated by husband Alan Hamel are nightclub dates from San Francisco to Toronto, a TV special taped from an aircraft carrier in the Indian Ocean and a fall TV series named after Somers, who will play a Chrissy-like character named Suzie who is “blonde, young, funny and dumb.” However, Somers has a side to her personality that appreciates the less-than-bubbly aspects of existence. For years she and Hamel have been accumulating California beach real estate. “I’m Michael Landon’s landlady and I’m always calling to ask him if the dryer needs fixing,” says Somers. Their eight-acre retreat in Palm Springs is even more of an investment in the future. Plans call for total self-sufficiency in the event of apocalypse, including solar power, windmills and a recently installed hydroponic garden. Says Somers: “We’ve got everything we’d need to survive—clothes, shoes and AÍ has cans of food stashed everywhere.”

Scraping by on a budget of $10,000 a month may not be everyone’s notion of hard times. But since Shah Reza Pahlavi of Iran abandoned his barren second wife, Soraya Esfandiari, in 1958, their fates have taken mutually unfortunate turns. The former actress saw her love life and hopes for a film career end when Italian director Franco Indovina was killed in a 1972 plane crash. When the shah died last year, her allowance was cut off and the once glamorous life of the Peacock throne was reduced to one of secrecy, constant fear of Iranian assassins and the bite of inflation. To get by, Esfandiari, 48, has put her 24-room Italian mansion up for sale. Next on the auction block is thought to be the fortune in jewels lavished on her by the heir-seeking shah.

Growling “I don’t know what the word defeat is,” commodore Donald Macdonald announced that Canada will launch an entry in the America’s Cup yacht race in 1983, Canada’s first representative in 102 years. Macdonald and three Calgary businessmen — attorney Marvin McDill, oilman Robert Muir and accountant William Neild—are prepared to invest up to $5 million to find and train an 11-member crew, plus captain, and commission Canadian shipwrights to construct a 12-metre vessel, to be named Let’s Do It. Macdonald describes his fellow sponsors as “just average guys,” all of whom own “gas-guzzling yachts.” Hefty opposition is expected from West Germany, France, Great Britain, Australia and the defending U.S. challengers, and boating experts are already raising questions about the seriousness of the Canadian effort. “It’s a great idea,” says Graeme Matheson, editor of Pacific Yachting, “but you can hardly blame people for being skeptical when a bunch of Calgary powerboat guys decide they want to take the America’s Cup.”