PEOPLE

PEOPLE

MARY MCIVER November 18 1985
PEOPLE

PEOPLE

MARY MCIVER November 18 1985

PEOPLE

She danced the tango with Charlie Chaplin and taught the twist to the Duke of Windsor—and now, at 55, Régine Zylberberg owns a chain of nightclubs in five different countries. She has also written her memoirs, whose title (Régine: Appelle Moi Par Mon Prenom) reflects her preference to be known by her first name. Published in France last June, it is rich with anecdotes about her celebrity customers and friends. Régine

recalls Ava Gardner spending an evening at one of her clubs, drinking whisky with beer chasers all by herself. And there was the time writer André Malraux, then France’s minister of culture, came early for dinner at Régine’s house and sat on the bidet munching peanuts and watching Régine get her hair done. Régine also writes that she once refused the Duchess of Windsor’s invitation to coffee, saying, “I only go to people’s homes for lunch or dinner.” Last week in Paris Régine said: “The reaction to my book has been wonderful, fabulous. People were surprised that behind all the glitz, glamor and rhinestones there was a hu-

man being with a tough and painful childhood.” Added Régine: “My next book will be more cruel.”

One critic has compared her mouth to the Niagara Escarpment, admits actress/comedian Linda Kash, 24. But she protests, “It’s not even as large as Tina Turner’s.” The daughter of contralto singer and Canada Council chairman Maureen Forrester and violinist/conductor Eugene Kash said that she once took classical training herself, but she added: “My teachers were trying to make my voice into something it isn’t. It seemed unnatural to sit in front of a mirror watching my uvula.”

Kash prefers appearing in Second City’s production of Andy Warhol Your Fifteen Minutes Are Up at the Old Firehall Theatre in Toronto, where she portrays a fan of Toronto Maple Leafs owner Harold Ballard, a reformed shopaholic and a bratty 12-year-old. Said Kash: “I would love to do experimental theatre, but Second City is more fun and it gives everyday people a chance to feel light and fluffy.”

Longtime friends ballerina/author Veronica Tennant, 38, and figure skater/artist Toller Cranston, 36, have collaborated on a just-published children’s book— The Nutcracker, based on the E.T.A. Hoffman story. Said Tennant, who wrote the lively text: “What surprises me about children is their degree of comprehension and sophistica-

tion.” Added Cranston, whose colorful exotic drawings decorate the story: “Children much prefer adult fairytales to Yogi Bear.” Tennant, who had already published a ballet-themed novel for children, On Stage, Please!, before her daughter, Jessica Wright, now 8, was born, said, “An exciting thing for me was finding facets of On Stage's lead character in my own daughter’s personality.” Cranston, although a bachelor, declared: “I love children. I adore children. I think I have a good rapport with children.” But he added a qualifying note: “I’m absolutely petrified of

Prime Minister Brian Mulroney and his wife, Mila, were among the 1,500 fans who gave singer Tina Turner a standing ovation at the Juno Awards in

Toronto last week after Turner’s showstopping duet with three-time award winner Bryan Adams. Mulroney said that he had met Turner before: “Mila and I and the kids went backstage once after a concert, to tell her how good we thought she was.” Mulroney accepted a special Juno on behalf of Canadians who bought the song Tears Are Not Enough, recorded by Canadian musical celebrities to raise money for Ethiopian famine relief. Mila Mulroney said that she admired the initiative of the rock ’n’ roll community for banding together on their own to raise money. “It’s very important that people learn to rely on less government intervention,” she said. For her part, Turner later declared at a press conference that she was thrilled to be in Canada. “Canada has been very supportive of me,” she said. She also announced that her movie biography is being planned and that slated to play her part is a singer she met in a bar in Montreal.

—Edited MARY MCIVER