PEOPLE

PEOPLE

YVONNE COX December 22 1986
PEOPLE

PEOPLE

YVONNE COX December 22 1986

PEOPLE

When actress Kim Basinger is away from the camera, she is every bit as mysterious as the sultry Cajun she plays opposite Richard Gere in the new thriller No Mercy. Gere said that they spent little rehearsal time together because “we wanted to keep it fresh, playing two characters who don’t know each other and yet are handcuffed together in the Louisiana bayou.” Although Basinger, 32, is fast becoming one of the screen’s leading sex sirens, fame appears to have had little effect on her. Said Richard Pearce, who directed her in No Mercy. “She never came to the daily rushes to watch herself. She comes to the set, does her work, and then leaves.”

Rock star and Nobel Peace Prize nominee Bob Geldof has a new mission—promoting his first solo album, Deep in the Heart of Nowhere. Until now Geldof has achieved greater fame as the organizer of Band Aid and Live Aid, major fundraising efforts for Ethiopian famine victims, than as the lead singer of the Irish rock band The Boomtown Rats. Still, he says that he does not deserve

his widely used nickname, “Saint Bob,” because he has “a very short temper.” Added Geldof: “Anyone who comes up to me dewy-eyed, prepared to kiss the denim collar, is in for a shock.”

Former Newfoundland premier Joey Smallwood made a rare and emotional public appearance in St. John’s last week to accept an early

Christmas gift. Smallwood, who turns 86 on Christmas Eve and who is the only living Father of Confederation, received Canada’s highest civilian honor—Companion of the Order of

Canada—on the 38th anniversary of the signing of the terms of union between Newfoundland and Canada. Smallwood, whose speech is impaired by a stroke suffered two years ago, declined public comment. Still, he attempted to sing The Ode to Newfoundland while teary-eyed relatives looked on. Said sister Dorothy Collins, 66:

“We all know this is long overdue.”

For 23 years Charlie Watts has kept a relatively low profile as drummer of The Rolling Stones. But recently the rock musician received top billing in a different music field—jazz. In Toronto’s 92-year-old Massey Hall last week he finished a five-city North American tour with what he called his “dream band,” a 32-piece jazz group that has just released its first album, The Charlie Watts Orchestra Live at

Fulham Town Hall. Watts, 45, said that he wanted to play in Massey Hall because jazz greats Charlie Parker and Duke Ellington once played there. “Walking onstage was like going to church,” he said. Watts said that he intends to stay with the Stones but hopes to make jazz more accessible to rock fans. Still, he added: “I’m not on a crusade. I don’t see myself as the Billy Graham of the jazz world.”

When Charlie Sheen, 21,

was filming the Vietnam war movie Platoon in a steamy Philippine jungle earlier this year, it was his second visit to that remote locale. As a 10year-old, Sheen had visited his actor-father, Martin, in the Philippine jungle during the making of one of the first Vietnam movies, Apocalypse Now. About that film, the younger Sheen recalled: “It was amazing witnessing this $50-million ¡2 dollar production with my dad 2 at its epicentre. He had a heart ^ attack during the shooting in £ those conditions and all the craziness.” And about returning to the jungle to film the soon-to-be-released Platoon, he added, “The malaria, poverty, stench in the air hit me like a twilight zone homecoming.”

Canadian actor Gordon Pinsent’s movie John and the Missus will have a limited and unpublicized release this week, more than a month before its official opening. The film will play in a suburban Toronto shopping centre for seven days before year’s end in order to qualify for a 1986 Genie Award nomination. Pinsent, 56, spent 12 years bringing John and the Missus, which he first Pinsent: limited run published as a novel and

then turned into a play, to the screen. “I knew that to make a worldclass Canadian film,” said Pinsent, “I would have to find a staff with the necessary integrity and commitment.” He directed and starred in the $2.3-million production, which he made on location in Newfoundland last summer. Making the movie was “labor,” recalled Pinsent. “The love came afterward.”

YVONNE COX