PEOPLE

PEOPLE

MARY MCIVER May 12 1986
PEOPLE

PEOPLE

MARY MCIVER May 12 1986

PEOPLE

A soft-rock song recorded by Princess Stephanie of Monaco, Ouragan (Hurricane), gained the No. 1 spot on the pop charts in France last week. Already a successful model and swimwear designer at 21, Stephanie now says, “With Ouragan, I have really discovered what my true vocation is.” She added that her mother, Princess Grace, who died in a 1982 car crash, would have approved: “Mama sang very well in the movie High Society. This is not my fault, it’s hereditary.”

French director Roger Vadim’s revealing book about three famous former mates, Bardot, Deneuve, Fonda, has provoked lawsuits by Brigitte Bardot (whom he married) and Catherine Deneuve (whom he did not). Vadim, 57, says that he expected Deneuve’s action: “Catherine sues people whenever they talk about her. She makes money like that because she doesn’t have to pay income tax on it.” But he added: “I’m more surprised about Brigitte. She is so unpredictable. One day she will tell me, ‘What you wrote is great, I love it!’ The next day she’ll say, ‘It’s terrible, how could you do this?”’ Vadim says that of the three women, he admires ex-wife Jane Fonda most. “Jane is far and away the most accomplished,” he says, and “any time she touches something, it makes money.”

Ottawa-born writer John Ralston Saul, 39, who now lives in Paris, angered Canadian financier Conrad Black last December when he accused him in the London Spectator of growing rich at the expense of a trail of depleted companies. In Toronto recently to promote his new novel, The Next Best Thing, Saul said that although he was intrigued by the subject of power, he is disappointed by the people who control

it. He compares them to Dickensian sycophant Uriah Heep, and adds: “The Harvard MBA is in power today. He’s a technocrat, a garage mechanic who can’t drive a car but has all the answers about how it runs. The people in power have never been so uninteresting.”

Vancouver broad■ caster Vicki Gabereau, 39, has resigned as I host of her popular CBC I radio talk-show to take on other projects. Among them is a script she is 1 writing for a TV series J 4 about the history of dogs ®

(working title: A Scent of Man). Gabereau says that although she is a dog fancier, she does not own one. Declared the freespirited Gabereau, who as Rosie Sunrise, one of a four-member performing clown troupe in Toronto, once ran for mayor: “You shouldn’t have a dog

unless you stay home. Or unless it’s grown up— and you are.”

Oscar-winning actor and civil libertarian Richard Dreyfuss attended an American Civil Liberties Union dinner in Reno, Nev., last week to present a 1986 Civil Libertarian of the Year Award to activist Rabbi Abraham Feinberg. The 86-year-old rabbi emeritus of Toronto’s Holy Blossom Temple briefly interrupted his controversial 34-year career in the rabbinate in 1932 to become the romantic radio singer “Anthony Frome, poet-prince of the airwaves.” Declared Dreyfuss: “I have spoken at many awards dinners but this is the first time I felt so certain the honorée deserved it.” Said Feinberg: “It was as though my life had been tied up in a red ribbon.” Then he hastily added: “But not in a box—just in a ribbon.”

is father is British and his mother Italian, and Jeff Wincott

credits his “good manners at the table and the respect I demand from people” to that combination. Although Wincott, who turns 30 this week, says that he likes to be “easygoing and nice to people,” when it comes to business, “I’m a meanie. Try to take me for a deal? Forget it.” The actor had real-life rehearsals for the role of Frank Giambone, the brash young police officer on the hit series Night Heat, when he was living in New York two years ago: he stopped muggings on six occasions. It helps to be tough _ when you are an actor, he £ says. “There are times , o when you go for three au¡1 ditions a day and not get them. What do you feel like? Mr. Rejection.” Added Wincott: “If you don’t like rejection, stay out of this business. They’ll

MARY MCIVER