LETTERS

Spreading mistrust

June 2 1986
LETTERS

Spreading mistrust

June 2 1986

Spreading mistrust

LETTERS

The cover of the May 12 issue (“A nuclear nightmare”) demonstrates the scare-mongering that has marked every hour since the Chernobyl accident. Following the lead of U.S. TV, you made the tragic misfortune an occasion to gloat and to spread further mistrust. There should have been a sympathetic, helpful response to this accident, if for no other reason than we may be in the position ourselves of needing world assistance after a nuclear explosion in one of our own plants.

-MABEL RICHARDS, Victoria

Finally, the Western media recognizes the Ukraine as an entity. At what price?

—LESIA SUMNA, Winnipeg

Alleged anti-Semitism

What really annoyed me about your review of my novel The Alley Cat (Le Matou) (“A game of cat and mouse,” Books, April 28) was the indirect reference to my alleged anti-Semitism. I am surprised that you did not consider it necessary to read my answers to those groundless accusations. The texts are readily available: the Sept. 11, 1985, Montreal Gazette and the March, 1986, Cinema Canada. No one has ever contradicted these responses, which leads me to conclude that everybody has been convinced by them. The book’s English translator and the owner of the English-language publishing company, as well as the film’s distributor in Quebec, are all Jewish. Is it realistic

I " S'C o § 8 o •sS Sát

to assume that these persons would blithely and knowingly encourage an anti-Semitic author?

-YVES BEAUCHEMIN, Longueuil, Que.,

Free trade safeguards

Your editorial on free trade (“A new path with risks,” May 5) would be humorous if its implicit conclusions were not so potentially tragic. You support free trade as long as your magazine is safeguarded. Western wheat, hog and cattle farmers say the same thing, just as East Coast fisheries are all for free trade as long as their subsidies are protected. Similarly, all Canadians expect their extensive social network to be left untouched. If you add up all the groups that expect to be protected, you find that 80 per cent of Canadians want free trade and the same 80 per cent want to be protected. The only groups that would benefit are the large banks, multinationals and export-intensive entrepreneurs who are here only because of our country’s raw materials and the artificially low dollar. These people have no ties to any country. They are truly world citizens because, as they say, a dollar bill has no nationality.

-H. MICHAEL COLLINS, Gooderham, Ont.

In its May 26 issue, Maclean’s incorrectly identified the subject of a photograph as Allan Taylor, the president of the Royal Bank of Canada, who is to be named chairman on June 1. The picture was actually that of Francis Lamont, vice-chairman of Richardson Greenshields of Canada Ltd. Maclean’s regrets the error.

Letters are edited and may be condensed. Writers should supply name, address and telephone number. Mail correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Maclean’s magazine, Maclean Hunter Bldg., 777 Bay St., Toronto, Ont. M5W1A7.