LETTERS

Canada’s homeless

March 2 1987
LETTERS

Canada’s homeless

March 2 1987

Canada’s homeless

LETTERS

Your cover story “The search for a future” (Feb. 16) brought home the social problem of meeting the needs of the homeless. As much as the article reminded the reader of the indignity brought upon so many of today’s adults, the starkness of the photographs served as an excellent visual reinforcement of this desolate problem. It was also important for Maclean ’s to provide an insight into the causes of this plight. However, the real problem remains as to what we as Canadians are going to do to alleviate this condition. Let us hear some specific strategies from the government and social service agencies.

-JACKIE BAJUS, Burlington, Ont.

What a work of art your Feb. 16 cover was. The young Canadian beauty it portrayed is a sign of the times—a damsel in distress. While the wealthy and the powerful gloat over the piling up of more wealth than they need, why can’t they, in co-operation with our government, guarantee the security and the future of those in whose hands they will have to place the future of our country? I hope somebody will hold out a helping hand to this young woman—and the generation she represents.

-DONALD J. MCLEOD, North Vancouver, B.C.

Pros and cons of frilly fashions

The editors at Maclean ’s have put their credibility on the line. I question the judgment of those who considered “Frilly—and very feminine” (Fashion, Feb. 9) a newsworthy item. The story

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was irrelevant to a newsmagazine and showed total disregard for its intelligent, thinking readership. Your responsibilities do not and should not include publishing stories with pictures offending women and subject matter alienating men. —MELISSA ROLFE,

Toronto

Finally the style cycle has rediscovered what makes men and women different. The re-emergence of frills and silk signals a new beginning. I love it.

-MENDELSON JOE, Toronto

Questioning priorities

What an appalling commentary on our relative sense of values when the death of one of the creative geniuses of film is buried away in a minor column (“A pioneer of animation,” Obituary, Feb. 9), while some packaged film star of the American screen is given cover-story coverage. Norman McLaren’s artistic originality, brilliance and humility have touched the hearts and souls of millions throughout the world, and his influence among artists in several fields is immeasurable. Have we really become so lobotomized by glitzy American culture that we can no longer recognize our real cultural heroes? —MICHAEL R. ANGEL,

Winnipeg

It is entirely typical of your magazine that you would choose to devote a page to the death of Liberace, complete with garish photo (“King of keyboard fashion,” Obituary, Feb. 16), and a short paragraph in Passages to remember Supreme Court of Canada Justice Julien Chouinard. —GRAEME CLARK,

Ottawa

Letters are edited and may be condensed. Writers should supply name, address and telephone number. Mail correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Maclean’s Magazine, Maclean Hunter Bldg., 777 Bay St., Toronto, Ont. M5W 1A7.