LETTERS

American bidder

June 15 1987
LETTERS

American bidder

June 15 1987

American bidder

LETTERS

In your story “The $5-billion man” (Cover, May 4), Amoco Canada Petroleum Ltd. president Don Stacy assures us that his company supports “the symphony, the ballet and other community events.” Stacy says, “It is laughable for people to think that a company like Amoco would not operate in the interests of Canada,” should it win its bid for Canada’s Dome Petroleum Ltd. Such patronizing commentary by an American corporate head in Canada is alarming. What is of interest in Canada is Amoco’s attitude on the ecology and environmental problems in Canada’s northern and arctic regions. Dome volunteered millions of dollars to lessen those risks; will Amoco be as amenable? Canadians who have experienced U.S. views on acid rain and other conservation issues have reason to be skeptical. -PAUL WINSTON,

Montreal

Arctic sovereignty

Your focus on Inuit traditions, in the context of arctic sovereignty, was astute (“An epic arctic journey,” Special Report, May 11). For millenia, those Canadians and their ancestors appropriated the offshore and laid the foundation for a Canadian claim to “historic title” to sovereignty throughout the area. American skeptics have conveniently overlooked the fact that the United States appropriated Delaware Bay and Chesapeake Bay by identically claiming “historic title.” And the U.S. Supreme Court recognized native appropriations of the offshore in Hawaii. In fact, Canadian

MOVING? CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-268-9057 r~e 5965523 in Toronto OR COMPLETE ThIS FORM AND MAIL AT LEAST 8 WEEKS BEFORE YOU MOVE MOVING DATE OLD ADDRESS NAME CITY NEW ADDRESS CITY ________________________ _____H PROVINCE POSTAl. CODE PROVINCE POSTAL CODE Maclean's Maclean's Subscription Dept. Box 1600, Postal Station A, Toronto, Ontario M5W 2B8

diplomats could have a field day hoisting American jurists on their own petard. —MARC DENHEZ,

Ottawa

Your editorial of May 11, “A nuclearfree North,” was most timely. Certainly, any proposal to use nuclear submarines to police our Northwest Passage and defend sovereignty claims over the area “threatens to fuel Cold War hostilities.” Your proposal to proclaim the Arctic “a nuclear-free zone” makes eminent good sense. —MURRAY STEWART,

Fredericton

The downfall of Hart

I am sick and tired of hearing about how American reporters felt about Gary Hart’s “poor” judgment regarding his alleged affair with Donna Rice (“The Sting of Scandal,” Cover, May 18). It is ridiculous to assume that a presidential hopeful should be scrutinized in terms of his private life rather than what he says about public issues. Gary Hart should not have had to resign from his campaign. Now, it’s only a matter of time before anyone with good “virtues” will decide not to run because of too much public scrutiny.—MARIA JELAVICH,

Vancouver

There is a universal law of cause and effect. This law is inexorable. Break it and it will eventually break you. It has been said, “To whom much is given, much is expected.” The press didn’t break Gary Hart, the “law” did.

— DOREEN MUNCASTER, Bragg Creek, Alta.

Letters are edited and may be condensed. Writers should supply name, address and telephone number. Mail correspondence to: Letters to the Editor, Maclean’s Magazine, Maclean Hunter Bldg., 777 Bay St., Toronto, Ont. M5W 1A7.