RECREATION

Celebrations of summer

July 13 1987
RECREATION

Celebrations of summer

July 13 1987

Celebrations of summer

RECREATION

Canada's summer has come at last. And across the land, Canadians have taken to the streets, parks—even the stands of rodeo corrals. It is the season of fairs, exhibitions, open-air contests, games, parades and pageantry. Crowds are flocking to the salty-sweet smell of hotdogs, the spin and swirl of dancers, the kettledrum boom of fireworks. The lifeblood of Canada's $20billion tourist industry, festivals help draw this country's invading army of 7.8 million foreign summer visitors. Summer's celebrations offer ethnic communities the chance to introduce their neighbors to the best face of midticulturalism. And festivals help local folk celebrate their homegrown skills. In Shediac, N.B., home

of one of North America ’s oldest and biggest lobster festivals, that means the craft of cracking claws. In Dawson City, Yukon, it consists of mixing a Sour Toe Cocktail—rendered authentic by stirring with a pickled human toe. Last year at the Abbotsford, B.C., air show, enthusiasm ran so high that captains of five nations' military demonstration teams risked court martial to engage in some spontaneous stunt flying. Dace again, Canada's festivals feature street musicians, comedians, highland games, folksingers and even turtle-racing derbies. In fact, the catalogue of Canada's festivals is too varied to list them all. A subjective Maclean’s sampling: