PEOPLE

PEOPLE

MARSHA BOULTON August 10 1987
PEOPLE

PEOPLE

MARSHA BOULTON August 10 1987

PEOPLE

The latest James Bond female foil, British-born actress Maryam d’Abo, says that she was unable to compete with the sensual performances of the leading ladies in the previous 14 official Bond movies. “I am very natural, and I don’t think I could play a really glamorous role,” said d’Abo, 27, who plays opposite Bond No. 4, Timothy Dalton, in The Living Daylights. Like many of her predecessors, such as Grace Jones, who learned judo for her role, d’Abo found that making a Bond movie can take a physical toll. “I had to learn to play the cello and ride a horse,” she said. Added d’Abo: “I had cramps from my fingertips to my bum.”

In the world of theatre, life after death is rare—but not impossible. Next month The Apprenticeship of Buddy Kravitz, the musical version of Mordecai Richler’s novel of the same name, is to be resurrected in Philadelphia en route to an expected run on Broadway. A 1984 cross-Canada tour of Duddy!, another musical version of the story, was also destined for New York City when it was abruptly cancelled after mixed reviews. Montreal producer Sam Gesser—who also mounted the first version—and his New York co-producers have hired Little Shop Of Horrors composer Alan Menken to write a new score for the American cast. If the show is a success, Gesser predicted that “Canadians will complain, ‘He didn’t come to us first.’ ” But he added: “I did— I couldn’t raise a penny in Canada, and I’ve raised $3 million in New York. That’s Canada all over.”

Wearing a backless, braless outfit, Chris Evert was

more than a tennis sensation on the courts in Vancouver last week. The bodyfitting, halter-style sun dress left little to the imagination as Evert, 32 and weighing 120 lb., led the U.S. team in the international Federation Cup tournament. Fashion designer Ted Tinling of Philadelphia created the outfit for her 10 years ago. She says that no other North American professional player wears anything similar. Said Evert: “Nobody else would dare.”

As Ms. magazine celebrates its 15th anniversary this year, Editor Gloria Steinern, 53, is up to her knees in controversy. She has angered some fellow feminists by posing for a magazine fashion layout wearing a miniskirt. And at a fund-raising event in

Toronto last week for The Pro-Choice Defence Fund, her knee caps were again front and centre as she addressed the gathering in a thigh-revealing pink knit outfit. Steinern said that women should have the right to have abortions in safety. Added the feminist: “The power of government stops at our skin.”

When Patty Duke

won the best supporting actress Academy Award in 1962 for her stunning performance as Helen Keller in The Miracle Worker, the 16-yearold star had already been introduced to a lifestyle of alcohol and drugs. In Call Me Anna: The Autobiography of Patty Duke, the actress, now 40, describes a woeful childhood that included attempted sexual abuse by her managers, John and Ethel Ross. Suicide attempts, failed marriages and romances with both Frank Sinatra and his

son, characterized her later years. A diagnosed manic depressive, Duke now claims that she has her extreme mood swings under control, thanks to the nonnarcotic drug lithium. Said Duke: “I

heard the phrase ‘there’s light at the end of the tunnel’ until I thought I would explode. Now I see the light, and I’m in it.”

After 18 years as a Chicago police officer, Dennis Farina did not need to research his role as Lt. Michael Torello on the TV drama series Crime Story. “Cops are the toughest critics,” said the craggy-faced actor, who plays a mean detective in the series that enters its second season this

fall on the Global Television Network. “I think everyone should be a cop once in his life,” said the former policeman. Added Farina, 43: “You meet all types of people.”

MARSHA BOULTON