PEOPLE

PEOPLE

MARSHA BOULTON August 31 1987
PEOPLE

PEOPLE

MARSHA BOULTON August 31 1987

PEOPLE

Although singer Tina Turner says that she believes in reincarnation, she adds that it is time for a vacation now.

“I would really love to have a year off,” said Turner, 47. The holiday will begin after Turner ends her 82-city North American tour in early 1988. A perpetual motion machine in the rock ’n’ roll world, the sharecropper’s daughter said:

“I’m a fast mover onstage. I still work myself up to a frenzy because I don’t think I know any other way to do it.”

In the world of dolls, the most popular boyfriend of all time may be the blond, blueeyed Ken doll, an IIV2inch foil to Barbie. This Christmas, Vancouver actor Michael Benyaer,

17, makes his cartoon debut as the voice of Ken in the television special Barbie and the Rockers.

“Barbie forms a rock band, and they go into outer space where they fend off a bunch of bad guys and promote world peace,” explains Benyaer. Although friends tease him about being the mouthpiece for a piece of vinyl, Benyaer said: “I’m nothing like Ken. And, please note, I am anatomically correct.”

At 16, Israeli-born David Sobelman

was sleeping under the bridges of Paris and associating with other long-haired runaway members of the 1960s youth scene. Now 37, Sobelman has helped to write and produce Runaways—2h Hours on the Street, a two-hour CBC TV documentary to be shown on Sept. 9. He says that modern runaways are different from the flower children of his teens. “There are two reasons these children are runaways: neglect and abuse, often sexual abuse,” said Sobelman. He discovered that “Vancouver is tough, and there is a lot of heroin. In Toronto there is more prostitution and it is easier to be anonymous. In Halifax there are 60 to 80 kids on the street at any given

time, and they all know each other. Frankly, I’m glad I went to university at 21.”

Following the publicity about Chris Evert’s braless tennis outfit at a recent Vancouver tournament, a mediaconducted survey at the Men’s Player’s International Tennis Championship in Montreal this month focused on the underpinnings of male players. Thirty-one players responded to the questionnaire, which asked them to describe their underwear. The reo suits revealed that briefs 1 are preferred over jockstraps, 4 to 1. But twotime U.S. Open champion Ivan Lendl and five-time Open champ Jimmy Connors still favor jockstraps, while Australian Pat Cash—the Wimbledon title holder— is clearly pro-briefs. Ion Tiriac, the Romanian manager of Boris Becker and Yugoslavia’s Slobodan (B0B0) Zivojinovlc, said that the six-foot, four-inch Yugoslav presents a special underwear challenge. Said Tiriac: “B0B0 has to have his custom made.”

Actor August Schellenberg has quit smoking and is about to start working out at a Toronto boxing club in preparation for a new role. Schellenberg, 53, will play former Canadian light-heavyweight boxing champion Yvon Durelle, in a movie based on the Baie Ste. Anne, N.B., native’s 1981 autobiography, The Fighting Fisherman. Schellenberg says that he is comfortable with the part. He has worked as a longshoreman in Montreal, the city where he was raised. Said Schellenberg: “I grew up boxing. Where I came from, everyone fought.”

Neither 12-foot breakers, oily water nor a week of flu have dampened the enthusiasm of marathon swimmer Jocelyn Muir, who is scheduled to finish her 460-mile record-making swim around Lake Ontario on Aug. 29. “All I can think about,” said the 21-year-old student, “is touching that wall—and then I get really excited.” Muir, who has averaged seven hours in the water daily since starting her swim on July 1, is undergoing the ordeal to raise money to fight multiple sclerosis. But she has developed a new concern: water pollution. Said Muir: “The worst part was swimming past the oil refineries around Rochester—the water is smelly, oily and browny black, and my skin itched for a day.”

-Edited by MARSHA BOULTON