OPENING NOTES

Karen Kain reveals all, John Turner disbands his team, and Dan McKenzie prepares for a hotter climate

December 19 1988

OPENING NOTES

Karen Kain reveals all, John Turner disbands his team, and Dan McKenzie prepares for a hotter climate

December 19 1988

OPENING NOTES

Karen Kain reveals all, John Turner disbands his team, and Dan McKenzie prepares for a hotter climate

JUST THE BARE FACTS

When 650 friends and admirers of Karen Kain gathered in Toronto last month to honor her 20-year career at the National Ballet of Canada, the compliments flowed as freely as the champagne. Among those paying tribute were fellow dancer Frank Augustyn and John Fraser, editor of Saturday Night magazine. Augustyn introduced himself as "the guy who stands behind Kain while she dances," while Fraser praised the ballerina's grace and beauty. It should be noted that neither man mentioned a memorable interview that took place in Jamaica in 1976. Fraser had flown down to interview Kain and Augustyn for a book that he was writing. Shortly after his arrival, Kain told Fraser that she and her partner were on their way to a nude beach—and invited him to interview them there. Fraser recalled that he was happy to tag along with "the two most perfect bodies in the world." Still, he had one complaint: he conducted the two-hour interview while lying on his stomach. Said Fraser: "I got a very sunburned bottom for my troubles."

The bitter fruits of defeat

As the Liberals prepare for another term in opposition, many of John Turner’s key advisers are moving on. Communications expert Henry Comor, who trained the leader to stop clearing his throat during TV interviews, will be cleaning out his Parliament Hill office when his contract expires at the end of the Senior policy adviser Robert Jackson, who is also a political science professor at Carleton University, is ready to resume writing and editing several books. Turner's deputy principal secretary in Quebec, Guy Sarault, is about to return to his Montreal law practice. And press secretary Ray Heard, who has been mulling over his future during a vacation in Hawaii, is expected to discuss the subject with Turner at an Ottawa lunch this week. Meanwhile, deputy principal secretary Douglas Kirkpatrick, who plans to leave on Feb. 1, is considering several options—including returning to work for Ontario Premier David Peterson. Only principal secretary Peter Connolly has tenure with Turner: he has agreed to stay on until the leader himself steps down. The pickings are slim on the losing side.

A NEW DUCK ON THE SHELF

Those who like their wines sweet and fizzy will soon have a new product to choose from. After winning a sevenyear legal battle with Andrés Wine recently, St. John’s, Nfid. ’s entrepreneur Donald Dooley is planning to launch his white sparkling wine, Newfie Duck, in 1989. Lawyers for Andrés Wine, which produces Baby Duck, had argued that the giant winery held exclusive Canadian rights to the duck nomenclature. But a Federal Court of Appeal disagreed, upholding Dooley’s right to market a similarly named wine. Now he can get quacking.

KEEPING UP APPEARANCES

When Nancy Regan became cohost of ATV’s popular nightly broadcast, Live at 5, the Maritime network ran a series of billboard ads to trumpet “The team you can trust.” In the ads, which include news anchorman Dave Wright, Regan appears to be shorter than her cohost, veteran broadcaster Steve Murphy. The reason: he was standing during the ad photo session while she was perched on a stool. A local satirical magazine, Frank, said that Murphy had stood on “half a dozen phone books to look taller than Nancy.” In feet, Murphy and Regan, the daughter of former Nova Scotia premier Gerald Regan, are the same height—five feet, eight inches. Frank staffers acknowledge that the magazine’s copublisher, David Bentley, has a longstanding feud with Murphy. They said that it began when the broadcaster took Bentley to task for publishing off-the-record remarks made by Diana, Princess of Wales, on a visit to Halifax in 1983. Maritimers never forget.

Roll the dice, comrades

Early next year, Soviet citizens will be able to indulge in a capitalistic pastime that has been popular with Westerners for 53 years. Parker Brothers has produced a Soviet version of Monopoly, written in Cyrillic. The manufacturer has replaced the familiar Atlantic City, N.J., place names with Moscow thoroughfares: the Boardwalk is now Arbat, a prestigious pedestrian mall. And stocks and life insurance—neither of which exist in the U.S.S.R.—have been eliminated. Still, one of the game’s sweetest rewards remains intact: players collect 200 rubles each time they pass “Go.”

CONTROVERSY ON THE COAST

Two Canadians who now live in New York City have won a contest to create a $39-million monument in Los Angeles, intended to rival the Statue of Liberty. But their prize-winning design has drawn loud criticism from city residents. Last week, local critics were comparing the arrangement of beams and girders to a giant grasshopper, a futuristic oil rig and a highway that has just blown up. Defending their design, former Montrealer Lise Anne Couture, 29, and Egyptian-born Hani Rashid, 30, said that the jumble of geometrical metal shapes reflected the sprawling diversity of the city. In fact, the privately financed monument will sprawl above four lanes of the busy Hollywood Freeway as the ultimate overpass.

Retiring to the sun

Dan McKenzie’s 16-year career on the Tory back benches ended earlier this year when he declined to run in last month’s federal election. And last July, Prime Minister Brian Mulroney swiftly fired the veteran MP for Winnipeg-Assiniboine from a parliamentary secretary’s job. The reason: McKenzie had voted against a bill to improve federal bilingual services. McKenzie was also a fervent booster of economic association with the Turks and Caicos Islands, even though senior Tories believed that such formal links would strain relations with Jamaica, the Bahamas and other Caribbean countries. Despite such clashes with his party’s line, McKenzie unabashedly requested an appointment from the Prime Minister’s Office shortly before he retired from Parliament. One of his suggestions was that he become the Canadian consul in San Francisco. Tory officials turned down the offer. Instead, McKenzie, a former telephone company supervisor, will be able to visit “ the islands of perpetual June,” as the Turks and Caicos are known, on official business. Mulroney’s officials have put him in charge of investigating economic development prospects for the impoverished islands. That position was also high on McKenzie’s wish list.

WAITING FOR THE CHIEF

As commissioner of the Canadian Football League for the past 4V2 years, Doug Mitchell has worked hard to save the financially troubled organization from collapse. But in the days preceding the Nov. 27 Grey Cup game in Ottawa, even the tireless Mitchell appeared to run out of energy. A day before the match, Mitchell failed to fulfil one of the usual functions of his office: riding in the Grey Cup parade. The following day, Mitchell, who will leave office on Jan. 1 and return to practising law, did not appear for a live interview on CBC TV’s Grey Cup Countdown. As a result, anchorman Brian Williams was reduced to apologizing for his guest's absence. But after a cliffhanger of a contest, in which the Winnipeg Blue Bombers defeated the British Columbia Lions by a score of 22-21, Mitchell had clearly recovered his enthusiasm. On a scale of one to 10, he rated the CFL as “an 11, at least.” A perfect 11.