PEOPLE

PEOPLE

November 6 1989
PEOPLE

PEOPLE

November 6 1989

PEOPLE

A seductress at work

With her recent series of roles as a steamy seductress, actress Ellen Barkin has established herself as a modern-day Hollywood screen siren. And the sultry blonde, who appeared as a bullied wife in her first movie, Diner, in 1982, appears determined to cement that reputation in two movies released back to back this fall. In

Johnny Handsome, Barkin, 35, stars as a triplecrossing temptress who seduces a thief played by actor Mickey Rourke. And in Sea of Love, she plays a murder suspect who ravishes AÍ Pacino in the part of a police detective hot on her trail. Still, Barkin said that pretending to make love before the cameras is more a product of “hard work” than natural talent. She added: “It’s like choreographing a dance. You get the steps down.”

Professional perils

Montreal-born actor Daniel Pilon says that hosting Stand-Ins for Danger, a one-hour documentary about stunt men scheduled for broadcast in 1990 on Global TV, gave him respect for the risky .business of performing stunts. Still, Pilon, who stars in the daytime drama The Guiding Light on CBC TV, added that being an actor can also take courage. Said Pilon, 48: “When you get in front of the camera, the biggest stunt of all is having no fear.”

A NIGHT TO REMEMBER

For Susan Bassett-Klauber and 400 guests, it was a chance to look back. Last week, the widow of Canadian businessman John F. Bassett held a dinner in Toronto to raise funds for the city's Bassett/Falk Cancer Research Foundation, which Bassett had founded before his death from a brain tumor at 47 in 1986. Among the highlights: a performance by singer Gordon Lightfoot and the debut of the documentary film The Final Season, which deals with Bassett's fight with cancer. Said Bassett-Klauber: "We all looked back, and that was healthy."

Charity drive

Her stellar form on the greens has earned golfer Betsy King the title of Ladies Professional Golf Association Player of the Year for 1989. But last week, King, 34, took a break from putting golf balls and turned instead to driving nails—as a volunteer with Appalachia Habitat for Humanity, a nonprofit charity that builds housing for underprivileged families in the American South. According to King, who has worked for the Tennessee-based organization one week each year since 1987, wielding a hammer is not unlike wielding a golf club. Said King: “It’s all in the wrist.”

Catalogue of an unwitting collector

When he invited 900 friends to Morocco in August to celebrate his 70th birthday, tycoon publisher Malcolm Forbes established himself as the king of ostentatious selfpromotion. And now, the flashy publisher of Forbes

magazine has documented his taste for the better things in life in his eighth book, More Than I Dreamed. Part autobiography and part straightforward inventory of possessions, the colorful volume unabashedly flaunts Forbes’s extensive acquisitions. Among the businessman’s fa-

vorites: a “money-green and gold” Boeing 727, 12 Russian Fabergé eggs, a fleet of 55 motorcycles and a French chateau. Still, Forbes claims that he did not set out to develop such an exhaustive array of possessions. Writes the billionaire: “I guess when certain things turn you on, and you accumulate enough of them, it’s a collection.”