PEOPLE

PEOPLE

December 11 1989
PEOPLE

PEOPLE

December 11 1989

PEOPLE

THE AFTERMATH OF GLORY

For some hockey heroes, retirement is the ultimate penalty. But not for Gordie Howe, who, with his wife, Colleen, has collaborated with writer Charles Wilkens to detail life after hockey for 10 NHL greats in their newly released book, After the Applause. They write that Maurice Richard, 68, still dreams of making a comeback and that Bobby Hull, 50, has been "biding time" since retiring in 1980. For his part, Howe, 61, said that he had no regrets about quitting. He added, "Physically, I was hurting so much that it didn't bother me."

Meech appeal

Quebec superstar Richard Séguin says that English-Canadians like to mix music and politics. Although he has been a pop idol in Quebec for 17 years, Séguin, 37, who sings only in French, said that he had expected to meet with some indifference during his recent tour through Ontario, Manitoba and British Coumbia. After all, he added, outside of Quebec, many record stores display his albums in their imported-records section “alongside music from Greece and Italy.” Instead, his concerts sold out, and Séguin said that he was “delighted” to find many new fans who “were so curious about me and Quebec.” Added the Montreal resident, whose recently released

album, Journée d’Amérique, has sold more than 100,000 copies: “Everyone wanted to talk to me.” But he said that a lot of anglophones were looking for insights into Quebec politics. Said Séguin: “Many wanted to talk to me more about Meech Lake than my music.”

A HEART-STOPPING VICTORY

With one kick, David Ridgway became the 1989 Grey Cup hero, but the British-born Saskatchewan Roughrider says that he does not want to relive his moment of glory. Ridgway, whose last-minute 35-yard field goal gave the Roughriders a 43-40 win over the Hamilton Tiger-Cats, says that he is not “so relaxed” a person that he can “enjoy” a decisive kick. “I’d rather win by 10 points—that would be a lot easier,” Ridgway said last week after being voted the game’s most valuable Canadian by the Football Reporters of Canada. Still, success under fire earned him loud cheers from the 17,000 fans who packed Regina’s Taylor Field on Nov. 27 to welcome the team home from Toronto. Ridgway, 30, who in the off-season works as a public-relations consultant in Regina, said that the Saskatchewan fans inspired the team’s upset victory. Said the kicker: “It’s not the best province, economically. The football team is one of the few things people have to root for, and the fans have stuck with us.”

SEXUAL DETACHMENT

Offscreen she is shy but, as a movie actress, Swedish star Lena Olin says that she is uninhibited. "When we act, we don't have to be responsible," added the 34-year-old who played an erotic lover in the 1988 awardwinning The Unbearable Lightness of Being. Now, Olin is playing an equally sensual mistress in Paul Mazursk/s adaptation of Nobelist Isaac Bashevis Singer's tale Enemies, A Love Story, filmed in Montreal and to be released on Dec. 13. Said Olin of acting out explicit sex scenes: "I will do it, because, after all, it isn't me, it's the character."

Today a movie, tomorrow the world

When 16-year-old Toronto actor Noam Zylberman got the starring role in the 1988movie The Outside Chance of Maximilian Glick, he says that he was ecstatic, “I felt like God. ” But now that he has succeeded as an actor—this week, he stars in the adventure miniseries Tom Alone on CBC TV— Zylberman says that he has bigger plans. Declared Zylberman: “I’m going to be a director and a Crown attorney—I have high hopes. ”