PEOPLE

PEOPLE

December 4 1989
PEOPLE

PEOPLE

December 4 1989

PEOPLE

AN EXPENSIVE DATE

Canadian actor David Elliott says that he is "happy" being a bachelor, but adds that he is willing to go on a blind date—for a good price. Last week, one fan bid $5,000 to have a champagne dinner and attend a Paul McCartney concert with the handsome star of

the CBC TV series Street Legal. The Milton, Ont.born actor was one of 44 bachelors who went on an auction block in Toronto as part of a fundraising event that raised $300,000 for the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada. For his part, Elliott, 29, said that he can promise his buyer one "fun evening." But he warned, "I'm not looking for a wife."

Royal relief

At the age of 7, Prince William has triggered his first royal scandal. Last week, The People, a British Sunday tabloid, ran picture of William relieving himself outdoors with the caption “Willie’s sly pee in park.” With that breach of etiquette on his school grounds, the little prince unwittingly found himself at the centre of a raging controversy. In an angry statement, his parents, Prince Charles and Diana, called the picture “intrusive and irresponsible.” Publisher Robert Maxwell agreed and fired the editor. In Britain, wee princes deserve a little respect.

Canadian writers a breed apart

Canadian Margaret Atwood says that she selected the 20 stories for the 1989 edition of The Best American Short Stories without knowing who the writers were. “The names were all inked out,” she explained. But Atwood, the first

Canadian to edit North America’s best-selling annual anthology of Canadian and American short stories, acknowledged that she was not working completely in the dark. The 50-year-old author, who chose four Canadian works for the collection, said that it was easy for her to

identify almost all of the Canadian authors, even though she had not previously read many of the stories that they submitted. She added that there were often obvious clues. Said Atwood, referring to Mavis Gallant’s story The Concert Party : “It was highly unlikely that an American would write about a young lad from Saskatchewan.”

Stop, in the name of love

American author J. Randy Taraborrelli maintains that he has been Diana Ross’s greatest admirer for 23 years. But his newly released biography about his idol, Call Her Miss Ross, is hardly a fan letter. Taraborrelli, 33, who said that he has been following Ross’s career since he was 10 and started her fan club four years later, writes that the superstar is “unrelenting” and forbids employees to address her by her first name. He also writes that Ross, 45, insists that concert promoters redecorate her dressing room and pay for bodyguards who must dress only in black. Said Taraborrelli: “Her whole career shows a certain lack of grace.”

PREDICTIONS OF SCANDAL

For Nancy Reagan, the future portends revenge and scandal, according to Joan Quigley, her onetime astrologer. Quigley's publisher, Steven Schragis, says that the San Francisco-based astrologer is miffed that in Reagan's recently released My Turn, the former first lady belittled Quigley's influence on the Reagan administration. “While astrology was a factor in determining Ronnie's schedule, it was never the only one, " writes Reagan. But Schragis said that Quigley is countering by writing What Did Joan Say? My Seven Years as a White House Astrologer to Nancy and Ronald Reagan, which tells of her power over the former first family. “Joan is angry that Nancy disavowed her, " said Schragis. “It seems Joan told the Reagans who to see and when to see them. " Reagan is declining comment. It seems that, this time, Reagan is leaving her fate entirely to the stars.