PEOPLE

PEOPLE

September 18 1989
PEOPLE

PEOPLE

September 18 1989

PEOPLE

TO THINE OWN SELF BE TRUE

Actor Raul Julia says that, while playing Archbishop Oscar Romero was a tremendous challenge, he does not want it to become his trademark. The Puerto Rico-born actor said that he wanted to play the Salvadoran human rights activist who was murdered in 1980, not because of any political beliefs, but because the role required a transformation from a timid priest into a courageous leader. "I did it for the role—I leave messages to Western Union," added Julia, 49, of Romero, which opens on Oct. 6. "I don't ever want to be identified with anybody, " Julia: ’I leave messages says Julia. "I just want to to Western Union’ be seen as an actor."

The power of seduction

Actress Kate Capshaw says that playing a “sassy” nightclub hostess in the thriller Black Rain, to be released on Sept. 22, was a chance to show off her seductive powers. Capshaw added that she enjoyed dressing in revealing gowns and enticing “powerful men” to confide in her. Off-screen, Capshaw, 34, earned her temptress reputation after celebrity-watchers claimed that Hollywood multimillionaire director Steven Spielberg recently separated from his wife, actress Amy Irving, to court Capshaw, who starred in Spielberg’s Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom. For her part, Capshaw said, “I haven’t done anything flashy—until this movie role.”

Set changes

After six months of playing a 19th-century prostitute, actress Louise Pitre says was still a “shock” to play a ern-day stripper. Pitre recently took a break from playing Fantine in the Toronto production of Les Misérables to star as an erotic dancer alongside Megan Follows and Shelley Peterson in a halfhour movie, Exposed. “I had to become more extroverted,” said the 32-year-old Welland, Ont. tive, who replaced Fantine’s period corset with a skimpy bikini. “I tried to convince Megan to strip first,” Pitre added, “but then I relaxed.”

FOR BETTER OR WORSE

Vancouver multimillionaire Murray Pezim is about to break a solemn vow—to remain a bachelor. The flamboyant 68-year-old mining-stock promoter, who publicly declared after his tempestuous separation in January from his third wife, stockbroker Susan Hanson, 35, that he would never remarry, now says that he plans a return trip to the altar. ”1 know I said I wouldn’t marry again—I lied, ” said Pezim after announcing his engagement to Tammy Patrick, 27, a former stockbroker and self-acknowledged reformed cocaine addict. Meanwhile, Pezim has acquired another new interest: football. The entrepreneur, who is also backing former NFL star Mark Gastineau’s quest to become a boxer, last week bought the debt-ridden B.C. Lions football club for$l. 7million. It seems that Pezim will gladly pay to leave scrimmages to the professionals.

Singing the blues for writers

There is much more to Canadian jazz singer Salome Bey than her powerhouse voice. But the Toronto resident, who has written a yet-to-be-produced musical, Rainboworld, about a street child yearning for a better future, said that

her fans only want to hear her sing the blues. “People have put me into a box, but I want these things I’ve written to get exposed,” she added. Freedom of expression is an issue that is close to her heart, said Bey, 48, who is performing at the Sept. 24 Toronto fund-raising gala to

launch the 54th International PEN World Congress. The concert, which also features guitarist Liona Boyd and singer Edith Butler, is in aid of writers imprisoned around the world for expressing controversial ideas. Said Bey: “I can understand how other writers feel when they can’t get out there and say what they want to say.”