PEOPLE

PEOPLE

November 26 1990
PEOPLE

PEOPLE

November 26 1990

PEOPLE

DRAMATIC RECONCILIATION

In the 1960s and 1970s, says playwright Michel Tremblay, "I was part of that generation that wanted to put a bomb in the family unit." Added the 48-year-old Montreal native: "So I did. I wrote many plays about the exploding of families." But Tremblay says that his latest play, La Maison suspendue (The Suspended House), the story of three generations of a Quebec family, is "about reconciliation." He added: "My generation thought that Quebec started with us. I realized I wanted to show what came before. I felt like being more tender."

A MODEL ACTRESS

Winning the 1986 Supermodel of the World con test in New York City and a $250,000 modelling contract at the age of 14 was, says Toronto native Monika Schnarre, "every girl's dream come true." But now, Schnarre, who moved to Los Angeles in May, is pursuing an acting career. In January, she will appear in the first episode of a detective series called Sweating Bullets playing a model framed for a murder. Said Schnarre, 19: "I only do contract modelling now. That's when you're exclusive to one company." But she added: "I'll also model for a lot of money. I don't turn down big jobs just because I'm an actress now."

Adapting Mowat for television

Canadian author Farley Mowat says that having others adapt his writing for the screen does not bother him. But he says that he hopes the newCBC TV adaptation of his 1956 ad venture novel, Lost in the Bar rens, will preserve the book's messages of respect for nature and nati yes. Added Mowat, 69: "Anything anybody can do to bridge the abyss between Ca nadians and the true first peo ples is a good thing these days."

Leading words

Controversial and opinionated,

Barbara Amiel is a commentator who rarely inspires indifference. And in January, Amiel, who is a monthly columnist for Maclean’s, will become the lead political columnist in The Sunday Times of London—the first woman and the first Canadian to hold the job. Amiel, who has lived in London since 1985, says that The Sunday Times “is the largest, most influential of the quality papers in Britain. To be the lead columnist means you have a healthy voice.” The 50-year-old author and journalist said that she is “terrified” by the appointment because “every Sunday in En-

gland, the world stops while every-

one reads their paper.” But, said the striking Amiel: “One gets old, one’s joints stiffen, it becomes important to reinvent yourself. Like any columnist, your job is to debate. In that process you may endear, alienate or inform.” Added Amiel: “One hopes that one informs more than one alienates.”

A PLAYER, A POET, A LEGEND

B efore Wayne Gretzky became a household name, Guy Lafleur was hockey's superstar. The all-star right winger, who now plays for the Quebec Nordiques, spent 13 years with the Montreal Canadiens-until his controversial early retirement in 1984. Lafleur was twice the NHL'S most valuable player, topped the league's scoring roster three times and, with the Canadiens, won five Stanley Cups. Last week, Montreal journalist Georges-Hebert Germain launched the English translation of Overtime: The Legend of Guy Lafleur. The biography chronicles Lafleur's life, includ ing the disputes with Canadiens management and his return to the game in 1988. But Germain details lesser-known facts. Lafleur, who is 39 and married, has had a hair transplant and, in 1980, he had an extramarital affair with an unnamed singer. He is also a poet. Wrote Lafleur: "Candle/By your light you make us dream/In your glow we lose our cares Nothing like the poetry Lafleur has carved on the ice.