CANADA

National Notes

November 5 1990
CANADA

National Notes

November 5 1990

National Notes

PREPARED FOR FORCE

External Affairs Minister Joe Clark told the Commons external affairs committee that Canada is prepared to use force, even without UN approval, to pressure Iraq to end its annexation of Kuwait (page 32). Three Canadian warships and a squadron of CF-18 fighter jets are in the troubled Persian Gulf as part of a multinational blockade against Iraq. Opposition critics accused Clark of “sabre-rattling.”

INJUNCTION ON HOLD

In Saskatchewan, the Court of Queen’s Bench agreed to the provincial government’s request for a week-long adjournment of hearings into Ottawa’s application to halt construction of the controversial Rafferty-Alameda dam project. As work continued on the dams, the court also turned down Ottawa’s application for an interim injunction until the case is heard this week.

EXPANDING A LAWSUIT

Former B.C. attorney general Stuart (Bud) Smith, who resigned in July after tapes of some of his car-phone conversations were made public by NDP justice critic Moe Sihota, named Sihota in a lawsuit. Smith, who is facing a defamation suit by Victoria lawyer Peter Firestone because of remarks made during two conversations, served legal notice to Sihota that if any libel had been committed against Firestone, it was due to the NDP critic’s release of the tapes.

OTTAWA DELAYS

In a special report, Official Languages Commissioner D’Iberville Fortier said that Ottawa is risking national unity by "unexplained and unjustified delays” in implementing the 1988 Official Languages Act, which would expand minority language services in the federal government and Crown agencies.

FIGHTING OTTAWA

The Quebec government and Hydro Quebec said they will appeal a National Energy Board decision that effectively would abrogate recent licences for Quebec power exports unless new dams, and improvements to existing facilities, are subjected to federal environmental reviews.

ONE STEP CLOSER

By a vote of 57 to 51, the new Conservative majority in the Senate defeated the recommendation of the Liberal-dominated Senate banking committee that the Goods and Services Tax be killed. The GST legislation now advances to thirdreading debate in the upper chamber.