PEOPLE

PEOPLE

March 12 1990
PEOPLE

PEOPLE

March 12 1990

PEOPLE

A SWEET RETURN TO SUCCESS

For pop legend Smokey Robinson, glory days are back again. In 1960, Robinson launched one of the most successful careers in pop history with a string of hits that included Shop Around. But in the 1980s, his fortune changed: the singer developed a cocaine

habit and in 1988 his close relationship with his Motown label suffered when it was sold to an entertainment consortium. Now, Robinson, 50, who said that he has kicked his drug habit, is making a comeback with a hit song, Everything You Touch, from his new album, Love, Smokey. Said Robinson: "Life is the best, the sweetest it has ever been."

For Canadian actress Rosemary Dunsmore, making a movie with Arnold Schwarzenegger proved to be an ordeal. Dunsmore, 34, who plays a doctor who physically subdues the strongman in Total Recall, to be released this summer, said that their fight was a “ball”—compared to having a cast made of her head for use in a murder scene. “It was awful having my entire head covered in plaster,” said the Toronto native. But worse, she said, was that she had suffered in vain. Declared Dunsmore: “They took a cast of the wrong person—my character doesn’t get killed.”

A headache

Sex, understanding and videotape

Actor Rob Lowe says that one of his favorite lines in his upcoming movie, Bad Influence, is, “No one is innocent,” spoken by Alex, an evil drifter played by Lowe. The 25-yearold actor should know. In June, 1989, Lowe was cast as

a real-life villain when it was disclosed that he had videotaped his sexual escapades with two young women, one of whom was 16. A civil lawsuit brought against Lowe by the girl’s mother, charging him with sexually exploiting a minor and causing her emotional trauma, is still pending. Lowe

Acting in a shadow

For London theatre critics, Jerry Hall cannot upstage the ghost of Marilyn Monroe. Hall, 33, a Texas-born model and Mick Jagger’s fiancée made her West End debut last week in Bus Stop, starring as the talentless singer Cherie in a role immortalized by Monroe in the 1956 movie. According to the reviewers, Hall, at six feet, is too big and self-assured to portray the vulnerable Cherie as well as Monroe did. Describing Hall as a “horse,” Charles Spencer of The Daily Telegraph wrote, “The mixture of pathos and sexiness which Monroe brought to the role is missing.” That seemed to leave the Monroe Ë legend intact.

STARTING FROM SCRATCH

He is acclaimed for his poetry and his novels, but at heart Canadian author Michael Ondaatje says that he is “a frustrated ñlm-maker. ” Now, at 46, he is about to begin work on his lifelong passion. Ondaatje was chosen, along with 12 other professionals from more than 200 applicants, to spend nine months making movies at director Norman Jewison’s Toronto-based Canadian Centre for Advanced Film Studies. Alumni of the twoyear-old program include actress Margot Kidder and photographer Gail Harvey. “If the centre had been around at the beginning of my career, I would have killed to get in, ” said the author of the 1987 novel In the Skin of the Lion. Still, the Toronto resident added that he is not planning movie adaptations of his own work. Instead, Ondaatje said, he wants to develop new screenplays. He added, Film has always been my obsession. ”

says that the scandal has taught him that “everyone is bad, everyone is good, everyone makes mistakes.” He added that, while he “aged 10 years” over his “bad judgment,” he has also learned to become a more understanding actor. Said Lowe about playing the immoral Alex: “There are many shades of grey in all of us.”