OPENING NOTES

Global warming has a silver lining, Mila Mulroney makes a hit in Houston, and the CIA gets into the game

July 23 1990

OPENING NOTES

Global warming has a silver lining, Mila Mulroney makes a hit in Houston, and the CIA gets into the game

July 23 1990

OPENING NOTES

Global warming has a silver lining, Mila Mulroney makes a hit in Houston, and the CIA gets into the game

REACHING THE SUMMIT

Amid all the mudslinging and critical commentary that usually follow politicians and their entourages as they make the global rounds from conference table to conference table, comes a complimentary nod in Canada's direction. During the recent economic summit held in Houston, the United States' First Lady, Barbara Bush, named the Prime Minister's wife, Mila Mulroney, as "everybody in the world's favorite." Bush, who played hostess to what is known as the "other summit," made up of the leaders' spouses, had kind words for all her guests, but she said that Mulroney impressed everyone, particularly with her fluent French. Said Bush: "I told her I was going to pay her for interpreting." For her part, Mulroney responded to a report of the compliment with modesty and aplomb. Said she: "I am pleased with the way things went. She [Bush] is a special friend." At least it seems that someone out there is not worried about having bilingualism shoved down their throats.

Buying power becomes horsepower

For Halifax car dealerships, perestroika to 15 years for a new Lada: “I can’t imagine means profits. Robert Buchanan, a saleswhat they do for parts when they get home.” man at MacLellan Lincoln Mercury, said that The Cuban Embassy parking lot? in one three-day period in July, sailors from the Soviet trawler Sergey Vasilisin bought 60 used cars in the area. According to Buchanan, the sailors are buying old cars for under $1,000. And they pay cash. Said Buchanan: “It has been enjoyable doing business with them, and for us it is a great way to get rid of older units.” William Kerr, manager of Cansov, a Halifax shipping agency, confirmed that there has been a recent run on used cars by Soviet sailors: “They buy the junkers to fix up. They buy Buicks, large cars, anything they can get a good deal on.” Added Kerr, who said that Soviets wait up

A NEW LOOK AT THE TIMES

Ever since the Toronto Globe and Mail purchased the Financial Times last December, there has been speculation that the new owners would turn it into a Sunday edition of the six-day-a-week Globe. Now, managing editor Michael Posner says that a redesign is planned for the weekly—one that will make it resemble the new Globe. Publisher Barbara Hyland confirmed that a redesigned Times will probably be launched in September. But she declined to go into detail. Said Hyland: “Well, we'd be giving away all our secrets. " Do tell.

Flag-raising for a distinct society

Adrian Macdonald, wife of Donald Macdonald, Canada’s high commissioner to Britain, raised eyebrows in London when she flew Quebec’s fleurde-lys flag beside the Maple Leaf during a Canada Day reception at the official residence in Grosvenor Square. Observed Kenneth Rose, society columnist for the Sunday Telegraph: “It cannot have pleased agents general from the other nine provinces.” Saskatchewan native Macdonald is unrepentant: “I borrowed the flag from Quebec’s representative in London, and he said, ‘You’re going to get into a lot of trouble.’ I told him, T don’t care.’ ” A little distinct diplomacy.

A JOURNEY BACK TO SCHOOL?

President George Bush’s close friendship with Secretary of State James Baker is having repercussions at the National Security Council. NSC officials say that because Bush consults almost exclusively with Baker on foreign policy issues, the NSC is becoming redundant. Now, White House insiders say that Condoleezza Rice, Bush’s attractive and widely respected Soviet policy expert at the NSC, is frustrated by her lack of influence. While neither Rice nor NSC officials would comment, reports said that Rice, 35, a for-

mer professor of political science at Stanford University in California, intends to return there at the end of this year. Rice has attracted considerable attention since joining the NSC a year ago. Said a White House aide: “You would look twice at summits, there would be 15 old white guys in grey suits and this one beautiful, young black woman.” The aide added: “But no one thinks of her as an ornament. They say she is brilliant. Condi leaving wouldn’t surprise anyone.” The NSC’s loss stands to be Stanford’s gain.

A GAME WITH INTELLIGENCE

With the Cold War on the wane, the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency is moving into the big leagues—of baseball, that is. CIA director William Webster recently invited Baltimore Orioles owner Eli Jacobs, the team's manager Frank Robinson and baseball commissioner Francis (Fay) Vincent to the agency's headquarters in Langley, Va., to take part in a panel discussion entitled 'The Art, Science and Philosophy of Baseball." About 500 CIA analysts and agents showed up. Said Webster: ''Baseball is particularly compatible with intelligence. Both demand the long view, a need for teamwork, a demand for individual performance. Both require excellence and precision." And an ability to steal important signals on the run.

Down East warms up

Amid warnings to North Americans about the adverse effects of global warming, some Atlantic Canadians are anticipating a silver lining. According to Peter Stokoe, a scientist at Dalhousie University who has just completed a global-warming study for Environment Canada, “There are definitely positive implications for some areas.” While acknowledging the threat of higher water levels in coastal regions, Stokoe predicted a longer tourist season for the Maritimes and he said that hotter temperatures in central North America will drive tourists to more moderate marine climates. Gordon Harmer, head of the Tourism Industry Association of Nova Scotia, said: “A warming trend would be most welcomed by Nova Scotia. The g problem with the Atlantic Ocean is that it is jr often too cold to swim in.” Blue skies over the I greenhouse.

Lament for a native

Billed as “the sweetest music this side of heaven,” Guy Lombardo’s big-band sound has hit a discordant note. A

museum honoring Lombardo in his birthplace, London, Ont.—he died in 1977—is losing money and may close. Lamented Tyrone Traher, cofounder of the museum: “I’ve said before that Liverpool has the Beatles, Boston has the Kennedys, Memphis has Elvis. Even St. Thomas, Ont., has Jumbo the elephant [who died there in 1885]. And we’ve got Lombardo. ”