CANADA

National Notes

September 10 1990
CANADA

National Notes

September 10 1990

National Notes

CANADA

BUCHANAN STUMBLES

Nova Scotia’s Liberals won a provincial byelection held in the riding of Cape Breton Centre—with Premier John Buchanan’s Conservatives placing third behind the NDP. The Tories, who still hold 28 seats in the 52-seat legislature, have faced allegations of widespread corruption within the government.

A DROP IN POPULARITY

According to an Angus Reid poll conducted just one week before Ontario’s Sept. 6 election, support for Premier David Peterson’s Liberals had slipped behind that of the provincial New Democrats under Bob Rae. The poll—considered accurate within a margin of plus or minus three percentage points, 19 times out of 20— put support for the NDP among decided voters at 38 per cent, compared with 34 per cent for the Liberals. The Tories remained in third place with 24 per cent.

DISCUSSING ABUSE

Roman Catholic Church officials announced that they are sending a package of information about sexual abuse within the church to the country’s 11.4 million Catholics. The information is intended to help parishioners deal with the recent rash of sexual abuse allegations and charges against priests.

PRIVATIZATION SETBACK

Saskatchewan Premier Grant Devine’s privatization campaign suffered a setback when the Court of Queen's Bench ruled against the Tory government’s attempt to sell the general insurance section of Saskatchewan Government Insurance, a Crown company.

DEPENDING ON DRUGS

A report presented to the annual meeting of the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police in St. John’s, Nlfd., said that illegal drugs are now the mainstay of organized crime in Canada. Said the report: “Every faction of organized crime depends on drugs as a primary source of income.”

BUFFALO SLAUGHTER

A federal environmental assessment panel recommended the slaughter of the largest herd of wild buffalo in the world, the roughly 4,000 plains and wood bison of Wood Buffalo National Park on the border between Alberta and the Northwest Territories. The panel said that there was no other way to eliminate the tuberculosis and brucellosis that have plagued the herd since the 1920s. The diseases could spread to cattle on neighboring ranches.