CANADA

National Notes

March 30 1992
CANADA

National Notes

March 30 1992

National Notes

HUMAN TRAGEDY

A government inquiry has determined that crew error was responsible for the Oct. 30 Hercules transport-plane crash in the High Arctic that resulted in the deaths of five people. Thirteen others were rescued in subfreezing temperatures two days after the C-130 went down. Survivor Susan Hillier, a civilian hairdresser, said that pilot Capt. John Couch had apologized to her before he died of hypothermia, eight hours before the rescue. “I thought we were over water,” Hillier recalled Couch telling her.

POLICE INQUIRY

One week after the Alberta Court of Appeal ordered a new trial for Wilson Nepoose, convicted in 1986 of murdering Marie Rose Desjarlais, the RCMP announced an internal inquiry into its handling of the case. One officer, Sgt. Don Zazulak, has been charged with perjury relating to his testimony during the appeal court’s review of the case last year. The court decided to order a new trial for Nepoose, 47, a Cree, because of the possibility that there may have been a miscarriage of justice.

TESTING THE LAW

In one of the first court decisions under new Criminal Code insanity provisions, a woman who killed her four-year-old son because she thought he was possessed by the spirit of Adolf Hitler was placed in the custody of her parents. Justice Kenneth Hanssen of the Manitoba Court of Queen’s Bench said that Donna Lynn Trueman of Winnipeg, found not guilty of murder by reason of insanity on March 13, had made great strides in her recovery. The new legislation, enacted Feb. 4, followed a Supreme Court of Canada ruling last May that the existing insanity law, under which people could be hospitalized indefinitely, was unconstitutional.

SOUL-SEARCHING

Solicitor General Douglas Lewis said that he has asked the Canadian Security Intelligence Service to review its mandate in light of international political changes. Said Lewis: “The lines have been redrawn, and I think it makes sense for us to be re-examining our priorities.”

FIRING UPHELD

Anglican Church Rev. James Ferry, fired from his job in Unionville, Ont., for refusing to leave a homosexual relationship, will not return to his pulpit. After a special bishop's court, the church, which accepts homosexual priests if they remain celibate, decided to uphold the firing.