CANADA

National Notes

April 27 1992
CANADA

National Notes

April 27 1992

National Notes

SEXUAL ABUSE AND CHILDREN

Douglas Kenny, 51, the superintendent of the now-closed Christian Brothers Mount Cashel orphanage in St. John’s, Nfld., from 1971 to 1976, was sentenced to five years in prison after his conviction for indecent assault against former residents of the orphanage. Eight other men have also been convicted of sex crimes committed at Mount Cashel. Meanwhile, Father Lucien Larre took the stand in his own defence to deny allegations that he physically or sexually abused residents of Regina’s Bosco Homes for troubled youth, which he founded in 1971. Larre, 59, who won the Order of Canada in 1983, is facing 11 assault-related charges, among them one of sexual assault and one of indecent assault.

YES TO BILINGUALISM

Residents of the Montreal suburb of Rosemere voted four to one in a referendum to keep their community bilingual. Rosemere enjoys an exemption from Quebec’s French-only language laws because the majority of its population was once nonfrancophone. But its francophone population is now more than 65 per cent—and Quebec language authorities have been trying to revoke the community’s officially bilingual status.

ANXIOUS MOMENTS

No one was injured when a twin-engine plane carrying New Brunswick Premier Frank McKenna and two pilots made an emergency belly landing at Fredericton airport. The plane had circled the provincial capital for two hours to prepare for the emergency landing because of stuck landing gear. Declared McKenna: “I was afraid—no doubt about that.”

DIOXIN WARNING

Dioxins in the Great Lakes are becoming an ever-increasing health hazard to both animals and humans, according to a report by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The EPA said that dioxin may be linked to sexual abnormalities in wildlife and cases of damage to the human immune and reproductive systems in the Great Lakes area.

MCDOUGALL SAYS NO

External Affairs Minister Barbara McDougall has rejected family pleas to ask Brazil to expel two Canadians currently serving 28-year sentences for the 1989 kidnapping of a Brazilian businessman. The families of Christine Lamont of Langley, B.C., and David Spencer of Moncton, N.B., insist that they were railroaded by the Brazilian justice system.