WORLD

World Notes

July 20 1992
WORLD

World Notes

July 20 1992

World Notes

WORLD

A DEAL IN ISRAEL

Prime minister-designate Yitzhak Rabin signed agreements with two small parties, the ultra-orthodox Shas and the leftist Meretz bloc, assuring his Labour Party-led coalition at least a 62-seat majority in Israel’s 120-seat Knesset (parliament). Labour, which won 44 seats in June elections that ended a 15-year reign by the right-wing Likud, is committed to giving Palestinians in the occupied territories limited self-rule by early next year.

ASSESSING MISCONDUCT

A federal jury in New York found bankrupt Pan American World Airways guilty of “wilful misconduct” for lax security in baggage handling before a bomb planted on a Pan Am airliner blew up over Lockerbie, Scotland, on Dec. 21,1988, killing all 259 people aboard and 11 on the ground. A further trial will assess the damages that are due to relatives of the victims.

A FIRST FOR POLAND

Poland’s parliament elected Hanna Suchoka, a 46-year-old lawyer who leads a seven-party coalition, as the country’s first woman prime ministeç. The vote followed the resignation of Prime Minister Waldemar Pawlak, who failed to form a government during a month in office.

CLOSING A CHAPTER

Career diplomat Thomas Klestil, 59, was sworn in as Austria’s president, closing a painful chapter in the country's history. Klestil replaced 73-year-old Kurt Waldheim, a former secretary general of the United Nations, who was largely isolated by Western governments during his sixyear term after it was disclosed that he served as an intelligence officer of the Nazi Wehrmacht in the Balkans.

AN ADMISSION OF GUILT

Officials in Tokyo acknowledged that, during the Second World War, Japan’s government forced tens of thousands of Asian women to work as sex slaves in brothels for imperial soldiers. Officials had earlier insisted that businessmen, not the government, had operated the brothels, in which thousands of women died.

GO DIRECTLY TO JAIL

In Miami, Federal Court Judge William Hoeveler sentenced former Panamanian dictator Gen. Manuel Noriega, convicted in April on eight counts of racketeering, money laundering and drug trafficking, to 40 years in prison. Noriega argued that Washington targeted him because he refused to let his country be dominated by the United States.