PEOPLE

PEOPLE

September 7 1992
PEOPLE

PEOPLE

September 7 1992

PEOPLE

Rocking royals

He calls her "Squidgy" and declares his love, she calls him "darling" and complains that her husband makes her life "torture," and the British tabloids are calling it another royal scandal. The furor erupted when the racy Sun newspaper, a chronicler of difficulties in the marriage of Diana, Princess of Wales, and Prince

Charles, published the transcript of a mobilephone conversation that it claimed a ham-radio operator had taped between Diana and marketing executive James Gilbey. Buckingham Palace, already reeling from published photos of a topless Duchess of York, estranged wife of Prince Andrew, declined to comment on the tape’s authenticity. But Britons could judge for themselves: thousands phoned a Sun hotline to hear the recording.

He says, she says

After feuding through the news media for almost two weeks, film-maker Woody Allen and actress Mia Farrow met face-to-face for the first time in the bitter custody battle over their three children. The couple met privately with

Judge Phyllis Gangel-Jacob last week in New York City and agreed to confine their dispute to the courtroom. There, the judge refused to examine nude photographs, introduced by one of Farrow’s lawyers, of the actress’s adopted daughter and Allen’s lover, Soon-Yi Farrow Previn,

taken by Allen. But while Allen, 56, and Farrow, 47, kept silent in public, his 91-yearold father, Martin Königsberg, entered the fray—and blamed Farrow’s mother, actress Maureen O’Sullivan, 81, for the scandal. Konigsberg told the New York Post that Farrow is “a nice girl,” but added: “I think her mother put her up to all of this.”

A call for change

Brendan Fraser says that he “just won’t buy prejudice.” And in the new movie School Ties, Fraser stars as a working-class Jewish teenager confronting racism at a snobbish prep school in 1950s New England. The U.S.-born actor, 23, who went to high school at Toronto’s Upper Canada College, said that he hopes the film will “help bring about some sort of change, in order to take steps towards healing the problems of society.” But he added: “I’m not trying to save the world. Please, I’m just an actor.”

A GOOD TIME TO SLING ZINGERS

In his latest book, If It's a Jungle Out There> Why Do I Have to Mow the Lawn?, Toronto Star columnist Joey Slinger pokes fun at nearly everything—from political correctness to baseball players to troubled English-French relations. And Slinger says that despite the constitutional accord between Ottawa and the premiers last month, Anglo-Franco friction will continue to provide fodder for his offbeat wit. "This is a wonderful time to be a humorist," added Slinger, 49. "Every time they go into a locked room, they come out with a new idea."

Breaking in

Ten years ago, Deborah Wright began attending junior hockey games in Ottawa and keeping a record of players whose talents impressed her. That pastime has paid off: last month, when the San Jose Sharks hired her to track Quebec hockey talent, she became the NHL’s first female scout. Wright, 26, said that the other scouts have given her a warm reception—although, she added, one of them did tell her that “the only place for women in hockey is as secretaries.” Said Wright: “But lately, when I see him he just talks hockey, so I guess he’s got over that little misconception.”