100 CANADIANS TO WATCH

Maclean’s celebrates tomorrow’s bold and visionary leaders

BRUCE WALLACE July 5 1993

100 CANADIANS TO WATCH

Maclean’s celebrates tomorrow’s bold and visionary leaders

BRUCE WALLACE July 5 1993

100 CANADIANS TO WATCH

Maclean’s celebrates tomorrow’s bold and visionary leaders

As a young man, he showed little sign that he would almost remake the world.

But the story of Julian, the fourth-century Roman emperor who began life as a reclusive scholar and who ultimately died in battle trying to throw back the advances of Christianity, still resonates as an example of how one person can leave a deep impression upon his time. Julian was a rebel, a believer in the righ-

teousness of philosophy during an age when Christian theology was asserting its power. He revelled in risk, becoming emperor after a succession of daring military triumphs. And as head of the empire, he plunged into the great political struggle of his century, dreamed of creating a better society and embraced the challenge of the spirit inside him that whispered: “Advance, to the farthest edge of the world.”

Julian’s failure to roll back the Christians marked a turning point in history. But as our own century rushes to its tumultuous, violent, confusing close, the qualities that led him to greatness are the same that we look for in our own leaders. We seek out those who show audacity and nerve, vision and talent, imagination and a competitive drive. We long for people who balk at doing things in the usual way simply because that is how they have always been done. We search for those who dream of options never before considered, and ask themselves: why not?

Those were the criteria considered by Maclean’s when, to mark Canada Day, 1993, the editors set out to identify potential leaders of tomorrow, 100 Canadians to watch in the coming years. The intention was not to create a ranking of Canadians or to profess to offer an exhaustive list of rising stars. Instead, the exercise aimed to point out young Canadians, from a variety of fields, whose names and faces are likely to gain greater attention in the decade ahead. The editors canvassed staff writers and reporters in bureaus, as well as reviewing nominations from readers, in search of Canadians who were beginning to establish a reputation and record of achievement. The result is an eclectic mix of people, from athletes to astronauts, musicians to engineers, actors to activists.

The register includes rebels like Jason Kenney, who challenged government spending in Western Canada, and activists like Man-

isha Bharti, the 17-year-old member of Ontario’s royal commission on education reform. Some of the 100 are listed because they are dreamers, like Montrealer Daniel Langlois, whose software was instrumental in creating the lifelike, computer-generated dinosaurs of Jurassic Park. Others are notable because they carry the benefits—and burdens—of inheritance, either as the stewards of family fortunes or in dealing with the legacy of a famous last name.

There are those who deal in risk, like stuntwoman Alison Reid, and those who deal in the test of competition, either as athletes or in business. And there are the artists, who through their talents entertain and enlighten. If you are searching for answers to the human struggle, wrote novelist Hugh MacLennan, himself a town crier of his generation, “Go to the musicians.” In the work of a few musicians, he wrote in his brilliant 1958 novel, The Watch that Ends the Night, “you can hear every aspect of this conflict between light and dark within the soul. You can hear all the contradictory fears, hopes, desires and passions.”

At another troubled time during this century, a generation that had already been ravaged by one war and was enduring a depresN sion was encouraged to pick up the pieces, to shoulder new burdens, to lead, not follow. The exhortation came from Winston Churchill, a leader who truly understood the components of character that contribute to the attainment of greatness. “You have not an hour to lose,” Churchill implored in his 1930 autobiography, My Early Life. “You must take your places in life’s fighting line. These are the years! Don’t be content with things as they are. Enter upon your inheritance, accept your responsibilities. You cannot hurt the world or even seriously distress her. She was made to be wooed and won by youth.”

The young Canadians on the following pages are stepping out— to entertain, to provoke and impress. Early signs of promise come with no guarantee of lifelong success. Some may, like Julian, see their dreams fall short in the end. But let them stand as beacons to their generation to try harder, to reach out, to get involved, to use the benefits of inheritance for greater good, to gamble a little.

To do it.

BRUCE WALLACE