CANADA

Canada NOTES

A FATEFUL ORDER

June 13 1994
CANADA

Canada NOTES

A FATEFUL ORDER

June 13 1994

Canada NOTES

A FATEFUL ORDER

A military court gave Maj. Anthony Seward a severe reprimand after finding him guilty of negligent performance of duty for issuing an order to abuse prisoners at a Canadian peacekeeping compound in Somalia. Seward, the most senior officer convicted so far in a series of courts martial arising from the beating death of a Somali teenager in March, 1993, will carry the reprimand on his record but will face no further repercussions.

DEADLOCKED DISPUTE

A majority of Newfoundland’s striking teachers rejected a settlement reached between their negotiators and the province. The Newfoundland government later rejected legislating an end to the strike, which has kept more than 100,000 students out of class since May 16.

SENTENCING A STALKER

Manitoba Judge Jeffrey Oliphant sentenced Ronald Edd Bell, 42, to life imprisonment for the brutal murder of Terri-Lyn Babb, a 25-year-old Winnipeg woman whom he had stalked for more than two years. Babb’s slaying in January, 1993, followed by another high-profile stalker killing just a week later in Manitoba, prompted the federal and provincial governments to implement anti-stalking measures, including adding the charge of criminal harassment to the Criminal Code.

MONITORING SEX ABUSERS

The federal government released a discussion paper that concludes that a national registry of people convicted of sexually abusing children could help to prevent schools and child care centres from unwittingly hiring offenders. Justice Minister Allan Rock has promised to set up such a registry by the fall.

DEMISE OF A LANDMARK

The 194-year-old St. George’s Anglican Church in downtown Halifax was reduced to a shell by fire. St. George’s, recently designated a national historic site, was believed to be the only wooden church of its type in North America,

A JILTED CHAMPION

Canadian biathlon champion Myriam Bédard, who won two gold medals at the Winter Olympics in February, has lost her main corporate sponsor. Metropolitan Life Insurance Co. said it dropped Bédard because she wanted too much money. Bédard’s agent said the deal fell apart because the company wanted exclusive sponsorship rights to the athlete.