COVER

Following the 'trail of blood'

May 29 1995
COVER

Following the 'trail of blood'

May 29 1995

Following the 'trail of blood'

With no witnesses and no murder weapon, the prosecution case hinges on proving that O. J. Simpson left a "trail of blood" beginning at Nicole Brown Simpson's townhouse on South Bundy, where the blooddrenched bodies of Nicole and her friend Ronald Goldman were discovered (top, right). According to the pros-

ecution’s DNA experts, the odds are one in 170 million that some drops of blood found at the South Bundy crime scene could have come from anybody but Simpson. DNA tests also showed a mixture of blood types from Simpson and the victims inside O.J.’s Ford Bronco (above). In addition, witnesses said, tests indicated that blood matching Goldman’s was found on the lining of a leather glove (middle, right) discovered at Simpson’s estate on North Rockingham—its mate was lying near the victims’ bodies. And stains consistent with Nicole’s DNA type were found on socks at the foot of Simpson’s bed (below glove) ; the odds of that blood coming from any Caucasian but Nicole, said prosecution experts, are one in 21 billion (the Earth’s population is about 5.5 billion, meaning the blood had to be hers). The defence, however, maintains that the DNA evidence is meaningless: that sloppy investigators mishandled the evidence, or that police doctored it in a conspiracy to frame Simpson.