PEOPLE

PEOPLE

BARBARA WICKENS July 24 1995
PEOPLE

PEOPLE

BARBARA WICKENS July 24 1995

PEOPLE

DANCES WITH DUDLEY THE DRAGON

Canadian actor Graham Greene likes a challenge. His recent roles include such diverse characters as a philosophical medicine man on the quirky CBS television drama Northern Exposure and a street-hardened cop in this summer’s action flick Die Hard With a Vengeance, which stars Bruce Willis. Now, Greene is expanding his repertoire again. In addition to recreating his Gemini-award winning role as

Mr. Crabby Tree on the syndicated children’s show The Adventures of Dudley the Dragon, Greene—who has been a guest on the show since its first season two years ago—will also play the Big Bad Wolf in a future episode paying tribute to Little Red Riding Hood. Joked Greene, whose big Hollywood breakthrough was the 1990 epic Dances with Wolves: “You just can’t get away from type-casting.”

PLAYINGHER PERSONAL BEST

Canada’s top touring professional golfer will not be playing in this season’s only major Ladies Professional Golf Association (LPGA) tournament north of the border. Dawn Coe-Jones, 34, of Lake Cowichan, B.C., has decided to drop out of the du Maurier Ltd. Classic in Beaconsfield, Que., in August because she and her husband, Jimmy Jones, are expecting their first child in late October. Coe-Jones had won $327,051 going into her final event before taking her maternity leave—last weekend’s U.S. Open in Colorado Springs, Colo.—and was on target to break her personal single-season earnings record of $350,730, set in 1993. That puts her in the top 10 on the LPGA Tour money list. So, although pregnancy clearly has not hurt her ability to compete on the golf course, Coe-Jones, who now lives in Lutz, Fla., near Tampa, says the time is right to take a break. She admits that her condition demands that she drink plenty of water and then keep track of “where the ladies’ rooms are along the way.” In addition to motherhood, Coe-Jones says she is looking forward to her first summer holiday since turning pro in 1983.

A DEBT OF GRATITUDE

On his second album, Ivan Neville gets a little help from his musical friends—Bonnie Raitt, Keith Richards and Branford Marsalis, to name a few. But the New Orleans singer and songwriter says he owes his biggest debt of gratitude to his family, father Aaron Neville and the rest of the clan who form The Neville Brothers. And that’s why, says the younger Neville, he titled the new CD Thanks. “I have a really cool dad,” he said. “Having the Neville name has always been an advantage.” Neville adds that although there were lots of family sing-alongs while he was growing up, there was no pressure to turn professional. He learned to play guitar at age 10, but it wasn’t until he was 17 and playing piano in his high school stage band that he became serious about music. “I was kind of shy, and I figured out it was a good way to get the girls’ attention,” he says. An inspiration of another kind.

INCREDIBLE ENCOUNTERS

Journalist C. D. B. Bryan

is as skeptical as the rest of his breed. He is an awardwinning writer whose best-selling book Friendly Fire told the story of an American soldier in Viet Nam killed by American troops. So, when Bryan cov-

ered a five-day conference on UFOs in June, 1992, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, he was prepared to treat it as a lark. But as the conference progressed, he says that he was intrigued both by the claims of alien abduc-

tions—some of children as young as 2, some corroborated by several witnesses—and by the fact that renowned scientists in fields from physics to psychiatry were trying to come to terms with the described events. Bryan’s most recent book, Close Encounters of the Fourth Kind: Alien Abduction, UFOs and the Conference at

M.Î.T., takes a serious look at the phenomenon and tries to explain why credible people are telling such incredible stories. He acknowledges, however, that there is a risk in taking that approach: “I wondered if I would ever be taken seriously again.”

BARBARA WICKENS