People

People

BARBARA WICKENS April 29 1996
People

People

BARBARA WICKENS April 29 1996

People

BARBARA WICKENS

The going rates in Hollywood

The woman famous for serving as sex broker to the stars is now promoting her own big-screen debut—in Heidi Fleiss: Hollywood Madam, a documentary by British director Nick Broomfield. Convicted of pandering, money laundering and tax evasion, Fleiss, 30, now faces up to seven years in prison. But she seems like an innocent compared with other characters in the film—notably her exlover, Ivan Nagy, and former Los Angeles police chief Daryl Gates, who is filmed taking $2,000 in cash from Broomfield for his interview. “Gates scooped up that cash quicker than a hooker,” Fleiss told Maclean’s. She added: “The justice system is haywire. I go to jail. But if you slit Nicole Simpson’s throat, you go play golf.” Still, before her June sentencing, Fleiss is hoping for “some miracle.” Claiming to have embarrassing information about police and judges, Hollywood’s Madam may still have a trick or two up her sleeve.

Sleepless

nights

For his newest movie,

The Quest, which opens this week across North America, Belgian action-film hero JeanClaude Van Damme had three demanding, timeconsuming duties. As well as starring as an orphan making his way in the world in what he calls “a classic martial arts epic,” Van Damme: ‘on the the actor took his first shot at directing. Van Damme—who began studying martial arts at age 11 and is a former European karate champion—also had to keep to a rigorous workout schedule. “It’s hard to be in shape when you are directing because

you are on the set 12 hours a day and you have to go see the dailies, the rushes and everything,” says Van Damme. “So to keep in shape, I was getting up and training for two good hours in the middle of the night. Then it was hard to go back to sleep. It was a nightmare.” Still, he shows no sign of slowing down. Van Damme just finished shooting his next movie, Bloodstone, in locations in southern France and Toronto, for release in the fall. In it, he portrays retired soldier Alain Moreau, who gets drawn into the Russian underworld as he searches for the murderers of his identical twin brother, a role he also plays. And, Van Damme says, he has no plans to cut back on his hectic schedule of action flicks: “I’m 35— I’ve got 20 years to think about it.”

No conquest for Norman

With his victory at the Augusta National Golf Club in Georgia, Britain’s Nick Faldo joined an elite list of just five other golfers who have won the coveted Masters tournament three or more times. Still, Faldo, 38, knew the 60th Masters would go down in golf history for the stunning collapse of Australian Greg Norman,

41, who went into the round on April 14 six shots ahead, but lost anyhow. “I hope to be remembered for shooting 67,” said Faldo after the match, “but obviously this will be remembered for what happened to Greg.” Norman,

with $55 million in lifetime earnings, seemed to take the defeat in stride: “I am a winner in life.”

Different drummers

They ran the Boston Marathon last week and then, their sweat barely dry, performed a concert, beating drums with sticks the size of baseball bats. For Ondekoza, Japan’s Demon Drummers, daily long-distance running is part of a strict communal regimen. But their mesmerizing displays of taiko (big drum) drumming are not as traditional as

they seem. It was Paris designer Pierre Cardin who first dressed the men in loin cloths, so that audiences could see their rippling muscles. And the 13-member troupe, now touring North America with four Canadian dates, has added two female members— breaking ancient taiko taboo. One of the distaff drummers is touring with a threemonth-old baby. “It was a mishap,” explains an Ondekoza spokesman.