WORLD

World NOTES

August 26 1996
WORLD

World NOTES

August 26 1996

World NOTES

WORLD

BABY BONUS

A woman expecting eight babies caused a new storm over birth issues and ethics in Britain. Welfare mother Mandy Allwood, 31, refuses to abort any of the fetuses, despite doctors’ warnings that she could kill herself and all the babies, because the masscirculation News of the World has reportedly promised her up to $2 million for her story. The more babies she has, the more money she will get. Politicians and commentators called it a new low in chequebook journalism.

MURDER ON CAMPUS

A 36-year-old San Diego State University graduate student shot and killed three engineering professors who were about to examine him on his master’s degree thesis, police said. Frederick Davidson walked into the interview room, picked up a 9-mm semi-automatic pistol he had hidden earlier in a first-aid box and began firing, they said. Davidson, who gave himself up afterward, was evidently upset that his thesis had previously been turned down.

KOREAN STANDOFF

Thousands of South Korean police faced off against 3,600 students occupying buildings at Seoul’s Yonsei University. Firing tear gas, police repeatedly stormed the campus but failed to dislodge the radicals. The students had been demonstrating in favor of immediate reunification with Communist North Korea. Such rallies are banned in the South.

KHMER ROUGE SPLIT

The former number 2 leader of Cambodia’s notorious Khmer Rouge guerrillas defected to the government, striking a major blow to the group. Former foreign minister leng Sary, blamed along with leader Pol Pot for the deaths of one million Cambodians when the Khmer Rouge ruled in the 1970s, appealed for national reconciliation. Cambodian leader Hun Sen said leng Sary and his followers would be forgiven for the sake of peace.

SRI LANKAN AID

Sri Lankan government forces lifted a three-week blockade and allowed trucks loaded with food to reach Tamils trapped by heavy fighting in the country’s north. Aid groups had expressed fears for some 200,000 people displaced by the government’s battle with Tamil Tiger separatists.

Flash-point fears in Cyprus

For more than 20 years, the bitter rivalry between the Greek and Turkish communities on Cyprus has made the divided eastern Mediterranean island a dangerous potential flash point. It is a major source of tension between Greece and Turkey, which are both members of NATO but regard each other as enemies. UN peacekeepers, including major contingents from Canada, have patrolled the island since 1964. So when violence boiled up again last week between Turkish and Greek Cypriots, diplomats from Brussels to the United Nations tried hard to calm the crisis.

The first outburst came on Aug. 11, when hundreds of ultrarightist Greek Cypriot motorcyclists tried to cross the UN-policed buffer zone into Turk-controlled territory in eastern Cyprus, defying a ban by the Greek Cypriot government in Nicosia. In the resulting clashes with Turkish troops and counterdemonstrators, a Greek Cypriot, Tassos Isaac, was beaten and killed. Three days later, 300 Greek Cypriots breached police lines and again crossed the buffer zone after attending Isaac’s

funeral nearby. Turkish troops opened fire and killed an unarmed man who had pulled down a Turkish flag. He was identified as Isaac’s second cousin, Salomos Salomou. Riot police moved in to head off more trouble at his funeral on Aug. 16.

The United States directly criticized the Turkish actions, calling the two killings “unwarranted and unjustified.” It said the situation remained worrisome, and scheduled talks with Cypriot leaders from both sides. Turkish troops have held the northern third of the island since invading in 1974, shortly after a pro-Athens coup engineered by the hardline military junta then ruling Greece. The junta collapsed a few days later. Some 1,200 UN peacekeepers, currently including two from Canada, patrol the so-called Attila Line dividing the island. The United Nations, the European Union and Washington have all tried to reunite the two rival areas in some kind of federal state, to no avail. Early this year, Greece and Turkey barely avoided a war over another, much tinier, island in the Aegean Sea.

I pfîPfï'« flflWPt* orpíiFi turn, Lebed called a news conference to denounce Interior Minister Anatoly Kulikov,

Russian security chief Alexander Lebed is who controls the military in Chechnya. Callknown for straight talking and aggressive ing Kulikov a man with a Napoleon complex, tactics. But his move last week was his Lebed blamed him directly for the Russian boldest yet: a shrill public demand that his failure in the southern republic. He said purkey rival on Chechnya policy be fired. Days suing the war was a “moral, ethical, human, earlier, President Boris Yeltsin had given official and every other kind of crime.” Lebed a sweeping mandate to end the 20Lebed’s bottom line to Yeltsin: “Only one month-old war with Chechen separatists, must stay—Lebed or Kulikov.” In response, which has cost 30,000 lives. Lebed promptthe interior minister also appealed to Yeltsin ly flew to Grozny, the Chechen capital, to decide between the two. Said Kulikov of where he negotiated a shaky ceasefire with Lebed: “I’m afraid he is going to ruin many rebels who hold most of the city. On his remore lives by his maniacal striving for power.”