People

People

BARBARA WICKENS September 23 1996
People

People

BARBARA WICKENS September 23 1996

People

BARBARA WICKENS

Not exactly an Oasis of calm

In a country that has searched 25 years for a rock band to match the Beatles, the Manchester group Oasis seemed an answer to British prayers. Their second album, (What’s the Story) Morning Glory?, sold 15 million copies worldwide. There was even a Lennon-McCartney feel to their music. But last week, the analogy went one step too far: a breakup, or so it seemed, as Noel Gallagher, 29, flew home to Britain midway through the band’s American tour. “Internal differences,” said their record company. A fistfight to be precise. Noel reportedly blamed poor ticket sales on the loutish behavior of his brother, Liam, 23, whose most recent transgressions included spilling beer and swearing on the MTV music awards this month. Fans hoping for a reconciliation might remember Noel’s onetime wish that Liam grow up. Said Noel: “The law of averages says he can’t be a knob for the rest of his life.”

Planet

power

Talk about power. Environmental activist and lawyer Robert Kennedy Jr. used his clout last week to help shed light on the Toronto International Film Festival’s premier of Power, a documentary chronicling the Cree’s successful six-year battle to halt Hydro Quebec’s Great Whale project. Kennedy took up the cause on Earth Day, 1990, when Cree and Inuit leaders arrived in New York City after paddling an odeyak—a combination canoe and kayak—from Montreal to dramatize the potential havoc the massive hydroelectric project would wreak on their lands in northern Quebec. Kennedy then worked closely with Cree Grand Chief Matthew Coon Come, among others, to bring about the cancellation of Hydro Quebec’s $17-billion contract with New York

state. Last week, the two friends got together again at a news conference and parade for Power, which opened last week. Kennedy was also the guest of honor at a $100-a-ticket ftmd-raiser for the film’s debt-ridden director Magnus Isacsson and producer Glen Salzman, at the home of civil rights lawyer Clayton Ruby. The film, Kennedy adds, is now a powerful tool in the environmentalists’ fight against “treating the planet as a business in liquidation, converting all of our natural resources into cash.”

Still the one to watch

Canadian country singer Shania Twain sure has gotten a lot of mileage out of one little CD. Last year, her second album, The Woman in Me, propelled the Timmins, Ont., native who now makes home in upper New York state, to five awards, including album of the year, at the Canadian Country Music Awards. At this year’s ceremony, held last week in Calgary, Twain, 31, picked up three of the chunky statuettes, including one for entertainer of the year—still on the strength of the eight-million selling The Woman in Me. Twain, however, had to share some of the awards for which she was nominated with this year’s rising star Terri Clark, 27, born in Medicine Hat, Alta., and now living in Nashville, Tenn., beat out Twain for single and album of the year for her self-titled debut CD. The twang goes on.

Behind the Bouvier mystique

For New York City author John H. Davis, the decision to write yet another book about his famous first cousin Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy was an easy one. With her death in 1994, Davis, 67, whose mother was a Bouvier, says he knew there would be lots of “trash” written about Jackie. “But I was in a position to tell the truth about the first 23 years of her life,” he says. The result is Jacqueline Bouvier: An Intimate Memoir, in which he draws on his own memories and family archives to write about her growing-up

years, ending with her 1953 marriage to John F. Kennedy. The person the young Jackie doted on most, says Davis, was her father, John Bouvier, who was often mistaken for Clark Gable. Davis recalls how at family gatherings at the Bouviers’ East Hampton estate, Black Jack would heap such lavish praise on his daughter that her cousins would retaliate with jealous outbursts. “Vfe would put burrs in her hair, even explode firecrackers in her face,” says Davis. Then, shaking his head at the long-ago memory, he adds: “She took it all pretty well.” And in marrying Kennedy, Davis says, “Jackie married a sexual adventurer very much like her father.”