Opening Notes

Bob Bossin

CHRIS WOOD June 8 1998
Opening Notes

Bob Bossin

CHRIS WOOD June 8 1998

Bob Bossin

CHRIS WOOD

DOUBLE TAKE

Back then, he looked like a premature! greying Groucho Marx. As the centre c anti-gravity in the folk-satiric group String band, and later with his one-man musica Bossin’s Home Remedy for Nuclear War, Bol Bossin created personal ballads, com! protest anthems and songs of true patrio love (one of his most popular songs was Th Maple Leaf Dog). He still looks like Grouchc just older, the hair whiter. But at 52, hi says he is “not very repentant.”

With Stringband partner Marie-Lym Hammond, Bossin made seven album from 1971 to 1986. Among the standout was the feminist ditty Show Us the Length in which a teen girl turns the tables at a schoc beauty contest and approaches the mab principal with

ruler in hand. After Stringband performed its last show at Expo 86, Bossin reemerged in an antinuclear folk musical, which toured in North America,

New Zealand and Australia.

In 1991, Bossin moved from Vancouver,

(the Toronto native’s home from the mid’80s) to Cabriola Island. The following year, he married dance teacher Mary Jo Fulmer with whom he had a child, Madelyn, now 5 “I can basically do what I want in a low-key frugal kind of way,” he says of his curren life. Much of what he wants to do revolves around his family; part of the frugality is heating with wood. “Between the householc and the woodpile, there’s limited time foi other projects.”

There have been a few, including the ode concert, a 1994 album and, the same year, ; video about Clayoquot Sound logging. An other undertaking is a Web page (www. is land.net/~oldfolk/), where Bossin sells hi¡ CDs and the video, offers wisdom, and signs off simply, “Bob Bossin, old folksinger.”