People

People

Model behaviour

Anthony Wilson-Smith April 10 2000
People

People

Model behaviour

Anthony Wilson-Smith April 10 2000

People

Model behaviour

Anthony Wilson-smith

Shanda Deziel

Claudia Schiffer acts without boundaries

In the new film Black and White, Claudia Schiffer trades in couture for sweats—and her makeup for gold chains. Her character, Greta, sells out her basketball star boyfriend and hooks up with a gangster rapper. “Claudia is open to anything and without limits in what she will conceive of,” says the films director, James Toback. “She is completely without inhibition.” But Schiffer says she does have one boundary. “I haven’t taken my clothes off for a film or for fashion,” says the 29-year-old German supermodel. “Right now, if I took my clothes off in movies, I would be exploited. Maybe later I’ll be comfortable if I’m perceived as being a good actress.” Schiffer recently got engaged to British tycoon Tim Jeffries. But she laughs at the thought of having kids:“My clock is super not ticking.” Nor will she give up modelling for acting: “There are still many lucrative modelling offers. I feel I’m right in the middle of my career.” Besides, a model always gets to wear clothes.

Steady Stojko salvages silver

Just when it looked as if Canada might be shut out of world figure-skating championship medals for the first time since 1981, Elvis Stojko leapt to the rescue. In the men’s free skate last week in Nice, France, Stojko landed eight triple jumps to earn the silver medal behind Russia’s Alexei Yagudin. Not bad considering the Richmond Hill, Ont., resident entered the final in fourth place. “I kept pushing through the program,” he said later. “I knew what had to be done.”

It was a disappointing event for some other Canadians. In their first worlds together, the fast-rising pair of Jamie Salé and David Pelletier faltered in their free skate and dropped to fourth. Stojko also struggled at times. The three-time world champion, who helped popularize the quad, didn’t land two of his four-rotation attempts in Nice. And at 28, he might have been tempted to retire after seeing 20-

year-old Yagudin win his third straight world gold. But next year’s worlds are in Vancouver, Stojko said—a good reason to stay for at least one more season. “I want this to sink in,” he said of his silver-winning finish, adding: “There was a lot of doubt from people, criticism, but this totally proves that no matter how old you are in this sport, you can make it work.”

Orchestrating Oscar

Although American composer John Corigliano has earned many of his profession’s highest achievements, he says no one in the “real world” noticed him until his recent Academy Award win in the best original score category for Canada’s The Red Violin. “Even if your opera is playing at the Met, only 0.1 per cent are aware of it,” says Corigliano, 62. “But [after the awards] every single person says ‘I saw you,’ people ask for your autograph. You realize this is royalty.”

And everybody needs to touch the Oscar. “It’s like a fetish,” says the Brooklyn, N.Y. native.

“Not just people on the street, but people like Farrah Fawcett—who asked, ‘Can I hold it?’ ”

Although The Red Violin was Corigliano’s second Academy Awardnominated film score—his first was for 1981’s Altered States—it will probably be his last. “I’m back in the symphony world,” he says during a stop in Minnesota, where he is launching a worldpremière orchestral piece. “I can contribute more here.” Even if it will go relatively unnoticed.