People

People

Anthony Wilson-Smith April 24 2000
People

People

Anthony Wilson-Smith April 24 2000

People

Swweeeeeeeeeeeepp!!

Anthony Wilson-Smith

Shanda Deziel

These are heady times for British Columbia curlers. Never mind that B.C. rinks gained national bragging rights by winning the Labatt Brier and Scott Tournament of Hearts, respectively. Last week, Kelly Law’s Richmond rink and Greg McAulay’s New Westminster foursome captured the women’s and men’s world championships in Glasgow. And earlier this season, a crew skipped by Brad Kuhn of Kelowna won the world junior title. “It’s amazing we got the men’s and women’s and the junior men’s and all out of B.C.,” McAulay said after defeating Sweden 9-4 in the final.

The Canadian women had a tougher time before outlasting Switzerland 7-6 in a three-hour batde. “There’s a certain amount of pressure on Canada to win at the worlds,” said a relieved Law. “It’s just nice that we came through.” There was another reason why the women wanted it so much:

they dedicated the win to the late Regina skip Sandra Schmirler, who died of cancer in February. “It means a lot for us to bring it back to Canada for her,” Law said.

La Vida Latina

Actress Maria Del Mar is a LatinCanadian best known for playing WASPish characters. When she auditioned for the film Price of Glory, a drama about a family of Latino boxers in Arizona, the director asked if she was sure she was Hispanic. “I know I don’t look like the stereotype,” laughs Del Mar, who was bom in Madrid and moved to Ottawa at age 5. “But I got past that hurdle when he realized my Spanish was better than his!”

Price of Glory is Del Mar’s first feature film after starring in the TV series Street Legal and making guest appearances on The Practice and Frasier. In the film, which also stars Jimmy Smits, Del Mar’s role is limited to a handful of lines—but she isn’t complaining. “I played the mom and wife,” she says, “so everyone had to love me.”

She shoots, she studies

The heroine of Canada’s come-from-behind 32 victory last week at the Womens World Hockey Championships in Mississauga, Ont., had litde time to celebrate. Jayna Hefford, 22, of Kingston, Ont., scored two third-period goals against the United States to force overtime and set the stage for teammate Nancy Drolet’s game-winner. But once the cheering stopped, Hefford, a University of Toronto phys-ed student, had to cram for exams after two weeks of missed classes during the tourney. And with an eye on the 2002 Olympics, Hefford plans to further hone her game. “There are more and better players,” she says. “It’s getting tougher every year just to make the team.”