PASSAGES

PASSAGES

June 5 2000
PASSAGES

PASSAGES

June 5 2000

PASSAGES

Died: Sir John Gielgud, 96, was world-acclaimed as an actor and perhaps most of all for his voice: in his 75-year acting career, it was compared to almost every musical instrument. Along with

Sir Laurence Olivier and Sir Ralph Richardson, Gielgud brought many of the greatest Shakespeare performances to the British stage. He embraced Hollywood later than his contemporaries and ended up with a remarkably eclectic film résumé. He played King Louis VII in Beckett, won an Academy Award for his role as the butler, Hobson, in Dudley Moore’s Arthur and played a naked Prospero in Peter Greenaway’s The Tempest remake, Prosperos Books. The openly gay Gielgud didn’t receive his knighthood until 1953, after Olivier lobbied for him. He died at his country home west of London.

Died: Dame Barbara Cartland, 98,

wrote 723 romance novels and was proclaimed by the Guinness Book of Records as the world’s top-selling author. She was known for her signature style-—to

the end, she sported pink frocks, jewels, white-fox furs, heavy makeup, and rode in a white Rolls-Royce. Cartland’s stories of Cinderella-type heroines and manly men were dictated to secretaries from her sofa and often completed in two weeks. Her daughter Raine married the 8 th Earl Spencer, father of Diana, Princess of Wales, making Cartland Diana’s step-grandmother. She died in London after a short illness.

Died: Former Progressive Conservative cabinet minister E.

Davie Fulton, 84, was a Rhodes Scholar whose Oxford accent, good looks and sharp intellect made him a ° standout in Ottawa. He was elected to the House of Commons seven times for the Kamloops, B.C., riding. He cochaired the 1964 Fulton-Favreau formula, which recommended that most major changes to the Constitution would require unanimous consent of the provinces—thus satisfying a key demand of Quebec, among others. Fulton served under Prime Minister John Diefenbaker and felt he had no future in Ottawa after he ran against Diefenbaker for the Tory leadership in 1956. “Dief thought I was disloyal,” Fulton recalled in 1989. After politics, he practised law in Vancouver and

took a seat on the province’s Supreme Court. Fulton, who acknowledged an alcohol-abuse problem, stepped down after a second drinking and driving conviction in 1981 for which he spent 14 days in jail. He died in a Vancouver hospital shortly after doctors discovered a lung clot and internal bleeding.

Donated: Retired McMaster University chemistry professor Richard Tomlinson, 76, gave $64 million to his alma mater, McGill University— the largest individual gift ever to a Canadian university. Tomlinson made most of his money investing in microchip maker Gennum Corp.: he said the grant is a “substantial fraction” of his worth.

Awarded: James Shapiro, a researcher at the University of Alberta, was given the Royal College of Surgeons Hunterian Professor award. His development of a cell-transplant procedure may ultimately free diabetes sufferers from daily insulin injections.

Died: Former Queen’s University principal David Smith, 68, established an international reputation for Queen’s department of economics before his appointment as principal in 1984. He

was a strong policy-maker who introduced the women’s studies program. He died of cancer.