Overture

A blast from the past

Shanda Deziel,Nicholas Jennings December 3 2001
Overture

A blast from the past

Shanda Deziel,Nicholas Jennings December 3 2001

A blast from the past

Overture

Shanda Deziel

Amy Cameron

Over and Under Achievers

Time for justice and reason

Joseph Facal: Quebec immigration minister rejects incendiary proposal for Quebec citizenship, raised last summer by a provincial committee. If Facal, of all people, can sound reasonable, there’s hope yet for his boss, Bernard Landry.

Anne McLellan: Justice minister accepts need to soften anti-terrorism law, but saves core measures. Endorsement from privacy commissioner George Radwanski, a tough critic of original bill, gives her a boost.

^Gerry Ritz: Obscure Saskatchewan MP and Alliance Question Period co-ordinator made the call to let Rob Anders -Calgary MP and notorious anti-Nelson-Mandeia ranterask a question on day Mandela was in Ottawa to accept honorary Canadian citizenship. Think, Gerry, think.

It could be called Shania’s Shame. A new CD features Canada’s queen of country music in her spandex and synth-pop days, when she worked and performed at the Deerhurst Resort in Huntsville, Ont. Recorded in 1988, before Eileen Twain had adopted the Ojibwa name Shania, The Complete Limelight Sessions (Limelight/Koch) uncovers the sort of cringe-worthy, generic pop that the pride of Timmins was writing and recording before she met Mutt Lange, her producer-husband, and became the highest-selling female artist in the history of country music. Of course, the man behind this album -which is being released with Twain’s blessing-doesn’t see it that way. “Eileen sang her heart out on these recordings,” says Harry Hinde, who cut 17 tracks with the aspiring 24-year-old singer. “I could never understand why I couldn’t get anywhere with this stuff. Her talent was so obvious.” But whether it’s Wild and Wicked, which Twain co-wrote with guitarist Paul Sabu, or her cover version of the Young Rascals’ 1965 hit / Ain't Gonna Eat Out My Heart Anymore, these recordings reflect

badly on the Canadian superstar, who now makes her home in Switzerland. The lowest point comes with her overblown treatment of Half Breed, a 1973 hit for Cher, complete with faux powwow drums. Twain,

whose disputed native heritage was once a source of controversy-her adoptive stepfather is Ojibwa-will wish that track, in particular, had never emerged from the vaults.

Nicholas Jennings