Entertainment Notes

Entertainment Notes

A dandy with a deadly proposition

Susan Oh March 19 2001
Entertainment Notes

Entertainment Notes

A dandy with a deadly proposition

Susan Oh March 19 2001

Entertainment Notes

A dandy with a deadly proposition

Susan Oh

In 1990, Darren Huenemann, a Victoria teen, convinced two classmates to murder his wealthy mother and grandmother by promising to share his inheritance. Huenemann, then 17, was living in a fantasy world inspired by the Albert Camus play Caligula. He believed he was himself an emperor, and enlisted fellow students David Muir and Derik Lord as his soldiers. Scorn, a new film by acclaimed Canadian director Sturla Gunnarsson ( The Diary of Evelyn Lau, Such a Long Journey), tells Huenemanris story right up to his imprisonment for life. Airing on the CBC on March 18 (8 p.m.), it also details a litdeknown aspect of the murderous teen’s life—he was gay.

Gunnarsson has said he wanted the film to be from Huenemanris point of view, to enter his fantasy. Therefore, Huenemann was the only one of the three boys interviewed by the filmmakers. They take his word on why Lord and Muir followed

him—irresistible charm. But Gunnarsson seems to overdo Huenemanris homoerotic allure. As portrayed by Eric Johnson, Huenemann is an over-the-top dandy who swans about in silk scarves and dressing gowns while dreaming up evil schemes. It all seems unbelievable. And despite strong performances by Brendan Fletcher and Bill Switzer as the juvenile hit men, the actors are unable to express what Lord and Muir have yet to divulge: their motivation for going along with this creepy rich kid.

At the end of Scorn, the filmmakers note that Huenemann will not be eligible for full parole for 25 years, but the fate of his accomplices isn’t even mentioned. It turns out that Muir is eligible for parole next year, but Lord won’t be eligible until he admits his guilt. The film’s failure to tie up those significant loose ends leaves it open to criticism, not to mention scorn.

Shanda Deziel

Brothers in a dangerous time

Love Come Down, a new film by JamaicanCanadian director Clement Virgo {Rude), is the story of two brothers. Now in their 20s, Neville (American Larenz Tate), and Matthew (Vancouver’s Martin Cummins) have relied on each other ever since they were boys and their mother killed their abusive father. Neville is now an aspiring comic who seeks happiness in designer drugs, while Matthew is a boxer whose raw emotions hurt him in the ring and in his personal life (Cummins won a best-supporting actor Genie for this role). Rounding out the cast are Rainbow Sun Francks, who plays their friend Julian, and Canadian R and B superstar Deborah Cox,

as Neville’s girlfriend, Niko. Cox turns in an exceptional performance as a singer mired in her own familial turmoil. These four sexy actors bring to life an otherwise conventional film, infusing tenderness into familiar territory. S.D.

Call to the barre

Katrin Hall wants to find at least two men who can dance and who have strong personalities when she visits Toronto. But she’s not looking for a date. Hall is the artistic director of the Iceland Dance Company, performing at Toronto’s Harbourfront Centre from March 13 to 17 and at the National Arts Centre in Ottawa on March 20. While in Toronto, Hall, 36, will hold auditions to fill spots for the two male dancers, and possibly one female, in the contemporary troupe. So far, she has received about a dozen résumés from Toronto artists. “It’s hard to find good male dancers anywhere in the world,” says Hall, the company’s artistic director since 1996, “but especially so in a conservative country of 270,000 people where if you say dance, they think frilly tutus.”

Entertainment Notes

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Inventing

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Herself

What do pioneering feminist Mary Wollstonecraft and Oprah Winfrey have in common? Germaine Greer and Diana, Princess of Wales? In the view of respected U.S. scholar Elaine Showalter, they all balked at genderbased restrictions on women’s lives, and all have something to reveal about the evolution of the female role in society. In Inventing Herself: Claiming a Feminist Intellectual Heritage (Distican), Showalter looks at the stmggles of a wide variety of women, focusing as much on their personal lives as their worldly accomplishments. Her subjects include the celebrated—Margaret Mead, Simone de Beauvoir, Hillary Rodham Clinton—and relatively obscure figures like Eleanor Marx, the youngest of Karl’s three daughters.

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