Entertainment Notes

Entertainment Notes

Family pilgrimage to a painful past

Susan Oh March 5 2001
Entertainment Notes

Entertainment Notes

Family pilgrimage to a painful past

Susan Oh March 5 2001

Entertainment Notes

Family pilgrimage to a painful past

Susan Oh

Last April, Vancouverite Richard Lowy, his two elder brothers, his father, Leo, and his mother, Joey, all made their first family trip, and Richard, then 42, captured it on film. But the result is no home video. Leo’s Journey is a one-hour documentary about the family’s pilgrimage to the places where Leo had suffered as one of Nazi physician Josef Mengele’s subjects in his experiments—including countless mysterious injections—on Jewish twins. Airing on History Television on March 8, the film recounts how 3,000 twin children were sacrificed to bogus medical experiments, which Leo and his twin sister, Miriam, survived (she died in 1998). It also fol-

lows Leo, now 72 and a retired Vancouver businessman, as he revisits his home town of Beregovo, Ukraine, and the concentration camp at Auschwitz-Birkenau, Poland. “Growing up, we never knew our father’s story,” Richard Lowy told Macleans. “Making this film, we experienced together what he went through, and it closed the circle for him.”

Grammy glory

Eleven Canadians were nominated, but only two walked away with gramophone statuettes at the annual Grammy Awards in Los Angeles. Hamilton native Daniel Lanois, 49, scooped up one for co-producing, with Brian Eno, U2’s hit record Beautiful Day (the rock band also won song of the year for the song of the same name). Veteran singer-songwriter Joni

Mitchell, 57, also helped salvage Canadian pride at the U.S. music industry’s big event, winning best traditional pop vocal album for Both Sides Now, which despite its category includes many jazz standards. It was the fifth Grammy for Mitchell, who won her first in 1969. That year, she won best folk performance for Clouds—an album that included a song with the tide Both Sides Now. It’s no illusion she’s a longtime favourite.

Friends, parents and a groupie

Current and forthcoming rentals available on video and DVD:

New Waterford Girl (Feb. 27)

The gently comedic tale of an unlikely friendship between two Cape Breton Island teenage girls-Mooney, who dreams of becoming a writer in Manhattan, and Lou, a feisty recent arrival from the Bronx.

Meet the Parents (March 6)

Ben Stiller plays a hapless man in love who must win over his girlfriend’s formidable father (Robert De Niro) in one disastrously slapstick weekend.

Almost Famous (March 13)

A coming-of-age story based on the real-life experiences of director Cameron Crowe, who started writing for Rolling Stone when he was only 15. Kate Hudson won an Oscar nomination for her portrayal of a groupie.

Her-story told

History told from a woman’s perspective—as in herstory—would likely differ from the generally accepted version of events. This feminist perspective is the underlying premise of a new six-part comedy series airing on CBC TV from March 5. The Broad Side is an in-your-face treatment of historical eras starring veteran comedic actors Susan Coyne and Diane Flacks, who also cowrote the series with Jane Ford. Despite some promising titles, notably “Big Bottom Botticelli” and “Chopin’s Sister,” the actual

episodes unravel into indulgent slapstick with overt lesbian tones that add little to historical perspective or comic effect. In one, a medieval Christian in a dungeon tells her fellow inmates: “No more of your pagan rituals, we’ll have no fat man in a red suit or decorated trees!” Despite its attempt to be fresh, The Broad Side is the sort of thing that gives history its reputation for being tedious.