People

People

Shanda Deziel September 17 2001
People

People

Shanda Deziel September 17 2001

People

Shanda Deziel

THE SUM OFTHEIR PUNK PARTS

The guys in Sum 41 are a little distracted.

Jay McCaslin has just finished chatting with his mother who is standing close by, and Steve Jocz is checking out the girls at the next table. “We don't play in Canada that often,” says McCaslin, the band’s bassist. “So, when we do, we try and make the best of it.” Sum 41 are Canadian-bred punk rockers—Dave Baksh (aka Brown Sound), McCaslin (aka Cone) and Deryck Whibiey (aka Bizzy D)—who got their start in Ajax, a small bedroom community northeast of Toronto. But with the release of their second CD, All Killer No Filler, they have found an uproarious welcome in the U.S.—where aggressive rock currendy rules. “It’s strange to be a Canadian band and be bigger in the States,” says Jocz, the drummer. “But our kind of music isn’t as

popular in Canada as it is in the U.S., and there are a lot more people there.” Currendy, the band’s single FatLip is in heavy radio rotation in both countries and they received nominations for both the MTV and MuchMusic video awards. They are also scheduled to appear on Saturday Night Live later this fall. The guys, now between the ages of 20 and 21, formed their band 41 days into the summer after Grade 11—hence Sum 41. And to them, small communities like their own are the most natural places for Canada’s new punk sound to come from. “If you go to the big city, there are just so many other things to do,” explains Whibiey, the band’s lead vocalist. “But most of our fans come from the suburbs. There you have nothing to do except listen to music and make noise.”

Drawing like a man

John Kricfalusi doesn’t like to see grown men hug. “It’s beyond me," says Kricfalusi, the Howard Stern equivalent of the animation world. “I was a hippie but we never hugged each other. There is only one reason men act sensitive and that’s to get the girls.” In response to the “modern man” in touch with his feelings, and an animation industry Kricfalusi feels has gone soft, comes his newest animation series, The Ripping Friends. Described by its creator as a show about manliness, The Ripping Friends began

airing on Teletoon in early September. And Kricfalusi was surprised to hear that the 13-episode series about four buff superheroes who solve every problem with their fists was given a 14-years-old and up rating. “The show is meant for little kids who are just starting to have manly instincts,” says the 46-yearold Ottawa native. “I’m trying to get the kids while they’re young and impressionable before they form personalities.”

The main characters are inspired by Kric-

falusi’s father, Mike. “He is the world’s most manly man and intolerant of anything wimpy,” says Kricfalusi, who developed the „ raunchy Ren & Stimpy show 21 I years ago. “Superheroes solve I everything with their fists,” he I says, admitting that he himself I hasn’t been in a fight since high s school. “Cartoons nowadays don’t have any fighting because of all the restrictions on TV. Real men want to see knuckles hit bone.” Quiche, anyone?

A centre with Sting

Unlike many modern-day pro athletes, Tammy Sutton-Brown won’t be able to slip away to a million-dollar beachfront home this off-season. In fact, the six-foot, four-inch, 200-lb. centre with the Charlotte Sting of the Women’s National Basketball Association plans to supplement her $33,000-a-year income by playing with European teams. “It would be nice to make the type of money the men make,” says the 23-yearold from Markham, Ont. “But the WNBA has only been around for five years.”

Sutton-Brown, while playing at Markham District High School, was closely watched by college basketball scouts and was wooed by Rutgers University in New Jersey, where she com| pleted a women’s stud« ies degree on a full ath| letic scholarship. Yet the ¡§ thought of playing pro J ball never crossed her mind. “I was really just thinking about getting a free education,” says SuttonBrown, who was Charlotte’s secondround draft pick in 2001.

Now that the Sting’s season is over— losing in the final to the Los Angeles Sparks—Sutton-Brown heads to Brazil this week, to play with the Canadian women’s national team in a world championships qualifying tournament. But unlike her male counterparts, this centre will have to fly economy.