Overture

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Danylo Hawaleshka,Derek Chezzi April 8 2002
Overture

Overture

Danylo Hawaleshka,Derek Chezzi April 8 2002

Overture

No news is good news, right?

Canadarm2 is on the fritz again. Last spring, a loopy computer chip in the limb’s shoulder forced MD Robotics in Brampton, Ont., to bypass the malfunction with new software. This time things are more serious-but you wouldn’t know it by talking to the Canadian Space Agency or NASA. Neither body issued a press release about the glitch, despite their habit of feeding reporters a steady diet of status reports of the all-systems-go sort. As it turns out, Canada’s $1.4-billion microgravity grappler, dangling from the International Space Station, now has troubles (possibly a short circuit in a wrist) severe enough that astronauts will be forced to replace the joint during a spacewalk in June. A CSA spokeswoman insisted no written advisory was dispatched because “this type of situation is part of the normal course of space activities.” The CSA says malfunctions are inevitable, and that, in any case, the arm still works. The problem is in the primary controls system, but the backup remains functional. Bottom line, however: the wrist must go. The next shuttle to the station is to launch as planned this week, but NASA postponed the following one by almost a month (to May 31) to give astronauts time to practise replacing the joint. The delay means the station’s three-man crew-due to return to Earth aboard that flight-will now be stranded for 26 extra days. “We didn't think it was particularly newsworthy,” said the CSA spokeswoman. Right. Can you say, Brampton, we have a problem? Danylo Hawaleshka

A journey of laughter and rhythm

In orderto dance professionally, Una Holbrook knew she had to leave Prince Edward Island. “If you are in the arts and want to grow, you have to travel,” says the Charlottetown native. So in pursuit of her dream, Holbrook studied in Jerusalem, Paris, Vienna, New York City and then found herself in Tel Aviv. It was there, while struggling with a busy schedule as a choreographer and dance teacher, that Holbrook

discovered Mayumana-a show that combines music, dance and performance art. The creators of the troupe were looking for people to work with and Holbrook heard about the auditions. “I didn’t really have the time,” she reflects. “But I went out of curiosity and fell in love.”

Five years later, Holbrook, 31, is returning to Canada, this time with Mayumana (pronounced my-YOU-ma-na)

in tow for their first North American performance, beginning in Toronto on April 2. To date, the 10-member cast has performed over 1,000 shows in Europe, South America and Asia. Using a combination of rhythm, acrobatics, music and, perhaps most important, humour, Mayumana is a “journey,” says Holbrook, who also trains in yoga, hip hop and rock climbing. “We feel that we have a joy of life, and to make someone smile doing something that you love is amazing.”

Moses leads us on a tour of his old TVs

What began as a simple fascination with television set design has blossomed into a cultural institution. The MZTV Museum-a Moses Znaimer brainchild-highlights the changing shape, size and technology of the boob tube over the course of a century, as well as its impact on the world. “We've taken television for granted since Day 1,” says Michael Adams, museum producer and Znaimer’s business manager. The space, which opens April 5 in Toronto’s ChumCityStore building, houses Znaimer’s collection of 300

TV sets that he started accumulating about 30 years ago. The museum is an extension of Watching TV, an exhibit that began in 1995 and appeared at « galleries across the country, including the national capital region’s Museum of Civilization and the Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies in Banff, Alta. Among the nearly 40 pieces on display are: a rare 1920s Jenkins Homebrew, a build-yourown television that uses a 1958 Predicta

pinhole disc to project the image onto a tube; RCA’s Phantom Teleceiver, made of transparent plastic resin and built f for the 1939 World’s Fair in New York City; and the first piece in ZnaimeTs collection, a 1958 Philco Predicta. Says Adams: “The story of television’s growth-that it went through a similar evolution as the dot-com companies of today-is one that few people know.”

Derek Chezzi