CLOSING NOTES

Review

Hollywood games

DEREK CHEZZI July 22 2002
CLOSING NOTES

Review

Hollywood games

DEREK CHEZZI July 22 2002

Review

Hollywood games

DISNEY’S LILO & STITCH (PlayStation);

LILO & STITCH: TROUBLE IN PARADISE (PC);

LILO & STITCH: HAWAIIAN ADVENTURE

(PC and Macintosh);

STITCH: EXPERIMENT 626 (PlayStation 2)

What’s a Disney animation blockbuster without the requisite merchandising? In Lilo & Stitch and Trouble in Paradise, the games follow the film’s protagonists-Hawaiian girl Lilo and her intergalactic pal Stitch-through a series of tasks based on scenes from the feature film. Hawaiian Adventure is a cute series of puzzles and activities-learning to hula, for example-for ages four and up. In Stitch: Experiment 626, players manoeuvre Stitch through alien worlds collecting DNA samples for use in an alien genetic experiment. Stitch is challenging enough that players younger than seven may become frustrated but those older than 12 might be bored.

BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER

(Xbox, late August)

Step into the shoes of Buffy Summers, high school student and vampire slayer, to battle demons and vampires. All the characters from the TV series are here and many of Buffy’s haunts-including Sunnydale High and the Bronze nightclub-are richly detailed. But players better hone their “slayer powers” because the game intelligence is sophisticated-infusing the undead with the ability to adapt to a gamer’s fighting style. Fans might be especially interested to learn that this title is based on a neverscreened episode from the third season.

STUNTMAN (PlayStation 2)

Ever had a hankering to drive a stunt car? Well Stuntman is probably the closest you’ll come while sitting on your couch. Time is money, and the cameras are rolling. Players will need all the skill they can muster as a film director guides them through death-defying stunts and they pilot different vehicles through manoeuvres that spoof Indiana Jones, James Bond and even The Dukes ofHazzard. Once shooting wraps, players watch a trailer incorporating clips from completed stunts. Beware: the load time between screens is excruciatingly slow. But the graphics are incredibly real, so much so that players are apt to feel like they’re actually on set.

DEREK CHEZZI

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