BACK TALK

The band that goes to Bath together stays together

JOHN INTINI July 12 2004
BACK TALK

The band that goes to Bath together stays together

JOHN INTINI July 12 2004

The band that goes to Bath together stays together

BACKTALK

John Intini’s Sentences 52

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Money’s Worth 55

The Tragically Hip’s recording studio in tiny Bath, Ont. (pop. 1,583) has all the trappings of a frat house. The exterior of the 162-year-old building is in disrepair and the wraparound porch is covered in cobwebs. The doors, all of which are left gaping, lead to cluttered rooms. And instruments-easily accessible should a creative moment strike-are strewn everywhere. “This has been our hideout and headquarters since we bought the place 10 years ago,” says bassist Gord Sinclair. “The vibe here is incredibly inspiring.”

This home away from the bandmates’ Toronto and Kingston, Ont., homes is where they wrote most of In Between Evolution, their 11th album. The guys talk proudly of having never swayed from their bluesy-rock roots and are content with their role as Canadian rock elders. “We’re moving into the Willie Nelson or Bob Dylan stage of our career,” says front man Gordon Downie. “As you get older, you play as much as you can. Why retire?” If they ever change their minds, they already have a pretty cool retirement pad.

JOHN INTINI

“For the long term, who knows? I guess we’ll all stay at this for a few years more.”

-Gord Sinclair in 1988, after the Hip released their debut album