August 1, 1909

SHORT STORIES

Yoke-Mates

SHORT STORIES

His Unmitigated Lie

HOME INTERESTS

The House Fly a Poisoner

Yoke-Mates 6465
SHORT STORIES

Yoke-Mates

HILLBRIGHT, oil-king and oil-prospector, turned from the pleasant retrospect of a forest of “chugging” derricks to let his probing eyes rest on Whipple, who had just told him some uncomplimenary things about himself. “Joel,” he said, quietly.
His Unmitigated Lie 8283
SHORT STORIES

His Unmitigated Lie

IF anywhere in "the forest primeval" there still linger the demons of ancient myth, the unhappy sprite bound up in cordwood fuel must have found along the line of the Lake Minnitaki Spur a congenial home. Cordwood was the alpha and omega, likewise the iota and kappa, of the spur.
The House Fly a Poisoner 7273
HOME INTERESTS

The House Fly a Poisoner

IT HAPPENS every day, and so one pays very little attention. May be it is the butter, or perhaps the slice of bread alongside one's plate. Or else, quite possibly, it is the milk in the pitcher. But, whatever it is that attracts the omnipresent fly, its appearance, as it crawls over the food on the table, is unappetizing.
British and American Ambassadors 130131

British and American Ambassadors

OF ALL diplomatic posts I have often thought the pleasantest in most ways and the most exacting in some is that of American Ambassador to the Court of St. James. Whoever holds it gets infiinitely nearer to the realities of English life than the representative of any other country.
Summer “Boreding”: A Lament 8889
SHORT STORIES

Summer “Boreding”: A Lament

"WHEN sparrows build and the leaves break forth, my old sorrow wakes and cries," and I know that I have once more to go out into this weary, beautiful, expensive world, and find a place wherein to spend the months that nature and New York have made intolerable in town.
In Advance of the Pullman 4647
SPECIAL ARTICLES

In Advance of the Pullman

IF YOU wish to experience every degree of lassitude, apathy and general indifference except in one respect, take a long journey by rail; nothing seems to breed ennui like the atmosphere of a railway carriage. A few hours in the train may be enjoyed, but with most travelers it is not long before the lethargic condition is reached and then the only thing of interest is—the journey’s end.
The Revolt of Jepson 9697
SHORT STORIES

The Revolt of Jepson

THE Jepsons had finished their evening meal and Mr. Jepson, paper in hand, was comfortably seated in his armchair toasting his slippered feet before the crackling fire. He did not look, however, as a domesticated and thoroughly contented young husband should look.
A Plea for Less Coal 114115
MISCELLANEOUS

A Plea for Less Coal

EVERY time the fire is shaken and replenished with coal, or the dusty ashes are removed from the grate, a great cry of human discontent arises in the land, and an old protest is recorded anew against one of those “necessary evils” of which there seems to be no end.
The Woman Inexplicable 110111
SHORT STORIES

The Woman Inexplicable

THE man paused at the gangway. "Two," he said shortly, presenting his pass. The purser nodded and the man sauntered across the gangplank. The girl turned and faced him. “Why did you do that?” she demanded curtly. The man shrugged his shoulders.
When an Emperor Ruled in Canada 3435
SPECIAL ARTICLES

When an Emperor Ruled in Canada

NORWAY HOUSE—Once it was a name to conjure with, the seat of an Empire where a man of Napoleonic bearing dictated to an army of servants in every part of Canada. When Lord Selkirk conceived and partially carried out his scheme of colonizing the Red River country in 1811 and the succeeding years all his emigrants passed through Norway House on their heartbreaking trip of seven hundred miles from York Factory to what is now Winnipeg.
July 11909 September 11909