April 1, 1911

FICTION

Through the Window

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THE BLACK PLAGUE

FICTION

The Peregrine Twins

Through the Window 4445
FICTION

Through the Window

JULIA, the nurse said to the few visitors who inqured, was “struggling back to life.” Julia herself, had she tried to formulate it, would hardly have called it that. It was no struggle; it was rather a growth. She had swung close to a certain nadir.
THE BLACK PLAGUE 9899
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THE BLACK PLAGUE

WHENEVER there is a great war, or an exciting event such as the siege of the anarchists in London, there are always enterprising photographers who will venture into most ticklish positions to obtain pictures of the event. Subsequently these pictures are reproduced in the various papers throughout the world.
The Peregrine Twins 6465
FICTION

The Peregrine Twins

I HAVE written what follows at the request of the young people principally concerned in the story. All the names have been changed, of course, and five years have passed; and since no one found it out at the time, there is small chance at this late day of the events being brought home to the real actors; and if they should be, it is no great matter now.
TEE PRICE OF PRUDERY. 112113
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TEE PRICE OF PRUDERY.

THERE is an uneasy feeling spreading over the whole country and the United States. It concerns an unmentionable disease, a disease that is worse than the Bubonic Plague because the plague does not claim the unborn generations. This disease flourishes because men and women are too “modest” to discuss means of checking it.
WHAT A MODERN NAVAL BATTLE IS REALLY LIKE. 120121
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WHAT A MODERN NAVAL BATTLE IS REALLY LIKE.

The world is forever increasing its armaments and yet it appears that there has not been a real test—that is to say a real engagement in war—of the most modern fleets with the exception of the battle of Tsu-Shima, in the Russo-Japanese War. We accept this statement on the part of London Magazine, as a preface to an intensely interesting article which it publishes, and which we reproduce in condensed form, from the pen of Captain Vladimir Semenoff, of the Russian fleet.
ENGLAND AND THE RECIPROCITY PACT. 128129
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ENGLAND AND THE RECIPROCITY PACT.

IN an editorial article in Current Literature one finds a very comprehensive summing up of the various views which have been expressed on the Reciprocity transactions between this country and the United States. The article quotes the American papers, pro and contra; it quotes the Canadian papers in the same way; but in addition it affords a review of the various opinions which are held by the leading English papers.
The Business Problems of the Day 7879
CANADIAN SPECIAL ARTICLES

The Business Problems of the Day

THE business men of the United States and Canada have been deeply concerned for a number of years—and this concern has been growing rather than lessening—over two problems: first: The relations between capital and labor; second: The relations between business and government.
The Seriousness of Modern War 3233
CANADIAN SPECIAL ARTICLES

The Seriousness of Modern War

IN this country we seldom have any real discussion of war. War is unpopular, and the general tendency, when the subject comes up is to devote ourselves exclusively to one aspect of it. and to spend our whole time in assertions that War is a dreadful thing, that it is a relic of past conditions of society, that it should be abolished, and so on.
"The End of the Road" 2829
FICTION

"The End of the Road"

I LEFT him standing in the door of his studio in Little Pierre Street, Montreal, waving his head, so to speak, and talking away to me and to himself, about ‘escaping.’ An hour before, I had dropped into his studio to tell him where I was going and where to send the next picture.
“THE AWAKENING OF THE AMERICAN BUSINESS MAN: THE NEW SCIENCE OF MANAGEMENT.” 132133
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“THE AWAKENING OF THE AMERICAN BUSINESS MAN: THE NEW SCIENCE OF MANAGEMENT.”

Rarely has a chance remark caused such wide and sudden interest, says Will Irwin in the Century, as one dropped last December by Louis D. Brandeis. He was arguing the case of the shippers against the railroads before the Interstate Commerce Commission. “By the application of scientific management,” he said, “the railroads of this country might save a million dollars a day.” That sentence—it happencil to be a quotation from Harrington Emerson’s work on scientific efficiency— buzzed over the country, bringing to a large part of the public the first informathat that a new principle had entered into industry.
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