June 1, 1911

FICTION

The Trail of ’98

Ye Gentle Art of Trouting

Wanted — Leisure

FICTION

A Wireless Tragedy

The Trail of ’98 6465
FICTION

The Trail of ’98

BOOK III.
Wanted — Leisure 128129
Ye Gentle Art of Trouting

Wanted — Leisure

BELOW we re-print a delightful editorial which appears under Temple Scott’s name in the Forum. Making a living is not living; making a living is only a means to living. We have not thought of this, of course. We are so tasked in the work that we have not the time in which to recover ourselves for reflection.
A Wireless Tragedy 4849
FICTION

A Wireless Tragedy

ON a bright June morning, the big liner New York, held in leash at her pier, was trembling and palpitating, the mighty heart of her engines beating fiercely, ready for the word to begin her quick dash across the Atlantic. Up in the chart-room, Captain Inness sat at the table with Roger Fosbrooke, a keen-eyed, well-set-up man who was one of the lawyers for the company, and Dixon, an extraordinarily dull-looking fellow, shabbily dressed, yet who was one of the most capable men in the detective service of the New York.
Detective Burns’ Great Cases 100101
THE BEST FROM THE CURRENT MAGAZINES

Detective Burns’ Great Cases

A MAN by the name of Burns has been making himself famous in the United States, and in fact, all over the world, as the man who claims to have captured the dynamitards who wrecked the Los Angeles Times Building. The labor unions claim that Burns is an enemy of organized labor, and that his case against the McNamara brothers is “faked.”
Weather Proverbs and their Justification 138139

Weather Proverbs and their Justification

THIS thousand-year-old observation by England’s wisest ruler recognizes the fact that fine weather induces good tempers, and therefore amply justifies the proverb that shrewdly bids one “Do business with men when the wind is in the northwest.”
“How I Got My Biggest Order” 120121
Ye Gentle Art of Trouting

“How I Got My Biggest Order”

WHEN the average man buys a single typewriter he feels as though he has made a big purchase, and the average typewriter salesman must find one such every day he is on the job if he expects to retain the respect of the head office. There are hundreds of men selling typewriters whose average is better than a machine a day, but when a man, single-handed, against the most fierce competition, bags an order for 475 machines all at one time, capturing a sale representing in money $42,750, he has accomplished something that makes his competitors take cognizance of his existence.
“What Does Germany Want?” 114115
Ye Gentle Art of Trouting

“What Does Germany Want?”

WHEN you see a man loitering around premises which do not belong to him; when, furthermore, you detect him looking through the windows, trying their fastenings and those of the door, it is safe to assume that it bodes no good to the owners of the property, says J. H. Manners Howe in London.
The Doctor’s Wife—Her Hour 2627
FICTION

The Doctor’s Wife—Her Hour

IT was twelve o’clock at night, but the Manager’s Wife, the Bookkeeper’s Wife, the Doctor’s Wife, and the Wife of the Night Foreman were still playing euchre in the shanty of Mrs. Harney, the Doctor’s Wife, in the camp of the Cuban Construction Company; while the Wife of the Walking Boss was sitting on the lounge, nursing a very wideawake baby.
Canada at the Imperial Conference 419
CANADIAN SPECIAL ARTICLES

Canada at the Imperial Conference

What Canada’s attitude will be on the various questions of Empire to be discussed by the Six Premiers in London
Sir William Mackenzie —Individualist 419
CANADIAN SPECIAL ARTICLES

Sir William Mackenzie —Individualist

THERE is bound to come, some day, a great struggle between things socialistic and things individualistic, in Canada. I am using the word socialistic in a very wide sense. Sir James Whitney, the Premier of Ontario, and the farmers of the western plains, are the “Socialistics” of Canada.
May 11911 July 11911