July 1, 1911

FICTION

The Trail of ’98

CANADIAN SPECIAL ARTICLES

Millions for Railroad Improvements in Canada

FICTION

A Ramble in Aphasia

The Trail of ’98 8687
FICTION

The Trail of ’98

"NO, no, I’m all right. Really I am. Please leave me alone. You want me to laugh? Ha! Ha! There! Is that all right now?” “No, it isn’t all right. It’s very far from all right, my boy; and this is where you and your little uncle here are going to have a real heart to heart talk.”
Millions for Railroad Improvements in Canada 4849
CANADIAN SPECIAL ARTICLES

Millions for Railroad Improvements in Canada

THE whistling of the air brakes on the seventeen hundred passenger and seven hundred freight trains, which are despatched over the steam railroads of Canada from Atlantic to Pacific every day of the year, is forever calling the attention of the traveler to the wonderful process of evolution through which the railroad systems of the country are passing.
A Ramble in Aphasia 5859
FICTION

A Ramble in Aphasia

MY WIFE and I parted on that morning in precisely our usual manner. She left her second cup of tea to follow me to the front door. There she plucked from my lapel the invisible strand of lint (the universal act of woman to proclaim ownership) and bade me take care of my cold.
Engineering in Agriculture as it Affects Competition Between Canada and the United States 104105
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Engineering in Agriculture as it Affects Competition Between Canada and the United States

WE reproduce the following article exactly as it appears in Cassier’s Magazine. This publication deals largely with engineering matters and in a technical way. But the following article by A. W. Day is not only timely, but well written. As the editor of Cassier’s points out in an editorial head-note, this article is very pertinent, in view of the closer trade relations which may soon be consummated between the two countries.
Hunting a Job in the Wicked City 138139
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Hunting a Job in the Wicked City

IT takes a writer like Eugene Wood to give the proper touch to the experience of the country lad who sets out from Johnnycake Corners to seek his fortune in the great city. This he does in the American Magazine. You pack your trunk and start for The Wicked City to make your fortune or your living.
One Of Many 4243
FICTION

One Of Many

IT was noon on University avenue, and the July sun had been shining many hours. Heat radiated from the pavements, the roadway, and even from the people on the street, who moved languidly, as though reluctant to make the effort necessary to reach their destinations.
The Commercial Strength of Great Britain 122123
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The Commercial Strength of Great Britain

THE British business man from the American standpoint is discussed in a very entertaining article in the Century Magazine by James Davenport Whelpley. We Americans are inclined to be impatient with English business methods, he begins.
The Tribulations of Trinity Tim 3233
FICTION

The Tribulations of Trinity Tim

"SKEETS,” I said, after the customary formalities attending the renewal of a friendship had been observed—“Skeets, how’s Trinity Tim? I’m ’most afraid to ask. He hasn’t gone the red-eye route and cashed in?” I was back in the Panhandle cow country for the first time in ten years.
The Mind and Sickness 3839
CANADIAN SPECIAL ARTICLES

The Mind and Sickness

THE words “psychology,” “psychic” and kindred terms pervade the literature of our day extensively, and from platform and pulpit we hear of “psychic treatment,” the “psychological moment,” etc., etc. In fact, psychology has apparently recently become a very interesting, not to say very fashionable “subject.”
The Lack of Privacy in the American Home 110111
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The Lack of Privacy in the American Home

ANOTHER man’s point of view is always interesting and when an English person writes of American homes—and Canadian homes are somewhat like those to the south—it is interesting to pause and examine the essay. Mary Mortimer Maxwell writes charmingly on this subject in the National Review, as follows: The typical American home has every comfort, every convenience, almost every charm except one.
June 11911 August 11911