December 7, 1981

COVER

Bidding for peace, and Europe's mind

BUSINESS

Nationalists in the boardrooms

DATELINE: FRANCE

Warfare in the corridors of power

Bidding for peace, and Europe's mind 4647
COVER

Bidding for peace, and Europe's mind

It was billed as a dramatic bid to snare a deadly prize that has eluded nations for generations. The stage was set with challenges flying across the Atlantic faster than the speed of intercontinental warheads. And the plot held no surprises.
Nationalists in the boardrooms 5455
BUSINESS

Nationalists in the boardrooms

Calgary’s Seventh Avenue has acquired a tidy, almost quaint continental ambience. Refurbished facades and the banning of car traffic have helped. But the sophistication is owed primarily to the city’s silent new light rail vehicles (LRVs) built in Düsseldorf, West Germany.
Warfare in the corridors of power 2223
DATELINE: FRANCE

Warfare in the corridors of power

Watching the crowds whooping over François Mitterrand’s Socialist victory on the Place de la Bastille last May, recalling another long-ago French revolution, the thoughts of one Paris banker turned to envy. “You know,” he said, “I was pretty sure my own head would roll.
A chess player’s moves to the top 1213
PROFILE: ALLAN GOTLIEB

A chess player’s moves to the top

A Victorian-style intellectual becomes ambassador in Reagan's roughhewn Washington
Caring for the little children 6667
CONSUMERISM

Caring for the little children

As the demand for day care heightens, canny entrepreneurs flood in to fill the void
Laying the blame 45
LETTERS

Laying the blame

Surely it’s unfair enough to place all the blame for the trials of the ’80s on the government without gleefully adding Finance Minister Allan MacEachen to the list of scapegoats (Budget '81: The Gathering Storm, Cover, Nov. 23). Isn’t it too easy an escape from our own responsibilities as citizens?
Britain’s political earthquake 3839
WORLD

Britain’s political earthquake

It was the bookmakers, even more than the pollsters, who confirmed that one of the biggest land mines in British political history was about to explode under Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher’s government last week. A day before the voters of Crosby went to the polls, two leading firms stopped taking bets on the byelection.
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THIS CANADA

A maritime jewel in a western lake

In the summer of 1876, a small flatboat loaded with Icelandic immigrants drifted uncertainly up Lake Winnipeg. The 150 settlers had fled their homeland because of volcanic eruptions on Mount Hecla that had spewed lava eight centimetres deep over 2,500 square miles.
Crippling the long arm of the law 1011
PODIUM

Crippling the long arm of the law

In the past five years 72 Canadians were killed by convicts free either on parole or mandatory supervision. That’s more than one Canadian killed every month from 1975 to 1980 under the auspices of a federal government that, perversely, shudders at the thought of state execution of even the most vicious or diabolical killers.
The Big Apple, worms and all 8889
COLUMN

The Big Apple, worms and all

One of the most pleasant experiences available to those of us in our dotage is to spend Sunday brunch at Central Falls, a place in SoHo down beyond Greenwich Village on the tip of Manhattan. It serves very nice scrambled eggs with smoked salmon along with an unassuming little California wine that has been personally trampled by indigent scriptwriters; a string quartet plays in an alcove by the window; and the joint doubles as an art gallery.
A world cast in rival images 4849
COVER

A world cast in rival images

The negotiators who begin their shuttle between the Soviet mission and U.S. offices in Geneva this week are heirs to an antagonism as old as the Bolshevik revolution. But it was the acquisition of sophisticated nuclear weapons that placed mankind’s survival in the hands of the superpowers.
November 301981 December 141981