January 18, 1982

The CBC’s daring new gamble 3839
COVER

The CBC’s daring new gamble

For 30 years, the bedtime ritual of millions of Canadians has included the CBC national news at 11 p.m. But times change and The National is no exception. Starting this week, viewers can catch the CBC news at 10 p.m. instead of the usual 11 p.m. as part of the boldest programming move in the corporation’s history.
The greening of a gossip columnist 1213
PROFILE: DENNY BOYD

The greening of a gossip columnist

Malcolm Gray
Old warriors 45
LETTERS

Old warriors

It was disheartening not to find any reference to the historic peace churches that take seriously the central teaching of Christ, to love our enemies and do good to our persecutors, in your story God’s New Warriors (Cover, Jan. 4). As a Mennonite and a member of that tradition, I am equally uncomfortable with the Jerry Falwell and the Marxist gunslinger type of rhetoric, both of which use Christianity for political ends and draw their central beliefs from outside of Christian teaching.
Going against the liberal grain 1819
Q&A: WILLIAM BUCKLEY JR,

Going against the liberal grain

Editor of the National Review, syndicated columnist, host of television’s Firing Line, novelist and political theoretician, William F. Buckley Jr. describes himself as a journalist “with an eye for political truths.” After 30 years of propounding those truths, Buckley, the most popular conservative in the U.S. according to the magazine Conservative Digest, now sees them enshrined in the Reagan White House and in American policy.
Advocacy ads: what the media didn’t say 4849
ADVERTISING

Advocacy ads: what the media didn’t say

The authoritative tones came from former CBC journalist Ken Colby, but there was more promise than deliverance in that television performance. For three months before the holidays, Colby hosted TV commercials for the Canadian Petroleum Association (CPA) featuring “interviews” with industry critics and lingering panoramas of offshore oil rigs and prairie pump jacks.
Gypsies up the fee for fortunes 44b44c
CONSUMERISM

Gypsies up the fee for fortunes

The bait arrives by flyer with the morning mail: come today—tomorrow may be too late. The spiritualists’ claims seem lofty but innocuous. One, an adviser on all problems of life, has the God-given power to heal. Another, a card and palm reader, uplifts the sick and depressed.
Bitterness clouds a U.S.-German accord 2829
WORLD

Bitterness clouds a U.S.-German accord

The weather was cold and damp as U.S. Secretary of State Alexander Haig breakfasted on fruit, toast and eggs with visiting West German Chancellor Helmut Schmidt. But inside Blair House, where the government installs visiting foreign leaders, enough heat was generated to melt much of the carefully constructed candy house of U.S.-German accord over the Polish crisis.
Of Jesus Christ and the Holy Grail 5455
RELIGION

Of Jesus Christ and the Holy Grail

It appeared to be a local mystery. How did a 19th-century French priest, living in an obscure village at the foot of the Pyrenees, suddenly amass a fortune amounting to several million dollars? And why did he then behave so oddly, building himself a stone tower, the Tour Magdala, and inscribing above the church door TERRIBILUS EST LOCUS ISTE (THIS PLACE IS TERRIBLE)?
Taking a well-aimed potshot 1011
PODIUM

Taking a well-aimed potshot

Like balladeers passing a popular chorus from generation to generation, succeeding Canadian governments have promised to temper this country’s harsh marijuana laws. They have condemned legislation which brands users of such a drug as criminals and sends increasing numbers of them to prison.
Lending a helping hand to the teenage parent 4647
LIVING

Lending a helping hand to the teenage parent

During the day, Rochelle Dentry, 19, is like almost every other Vancouver teenage girl. While padding around the halls of her high school in jeans, she chats with her friends and bemoans the necessity of homework. But when school finishes, she suddenly moves into her other life.
Leading us around by the clause 6465
COLUMN

Leading us around by the clause

The famed lexicographer Patrick Nagle maintains that lawyers can pick fly droppings out of pepper while wearing boxing gloves. As evidence, we have only to look at our pockmarked constitution, still quivering at Westminster, all full of pinpricks, loopholes, crochet work and binder twine.
January 111982 January 251982