April 12, 1982

THE STRUGGLE FOR THE HOLY LAND 3435
COVER

THE STRUGGLE FOR THE HOLY LAND

As the exodus began, an old bedouin woman cocooned in black stood like a sentinel in the Sinai sand. Across the road, the human remnant of Yamit—this once prospering community of 6,000 Israelis—was performing its sober last rites. Hired movers were packing lorries with mattresses, bicycles and other household effects, trampling through little gardens gone suddenly to weed.
The crest of a new wave 5657
BOOKS

The crest of a new wave

In the early ’70s, Canadian literary presses were flourishing. Dozens of these small, ambitious companies were digging up new talent and—with mixed emotions—serving as a farm system for larger, more established firms. Many well-known writers, from Margaret Atwood to Matt Cohen, made their debuts under idiosyncratic imprints such as Contact, Anansi and Sono Nis.
A super-minister at home on the range 1213
PROFILE: BUD OLSON

A super-minister at home on the range

Canada’s honey producers were flat broke back in 1968 when they trudged to Ottawa to wheedle money from the fledgling agriculture minister. Prices were rock bottom, the old crop had not been sold and the new crop was about to be collected. So they pleaded with Bud Olson to save the industry and buy their surplus.
No more Cinderella for the Expos 4041
SPORTS

No more Cinderella for the Expos

In spring, when young ballplayers’ thoughts turn to option years and multimillion-dollar contracts, a young man in a Montreal Expos uniform turns his thoughts to winter. “I guess the snow’s just about gone in Quebec,” muses Gary Carter.
PEOPLE 2829

PEOPLE

It was expected to be the most predictable Academy Awards ceremony in years. But, when Loretta Young tore open the final envelope of the long, long evening, the 54th Oscars turned into a Cinderella story. Chariots of Fire, made in England for a paltry $7.3 million and fighting 7-to-1 odds against receiving even a nomination, won the most prestigious Oscar of all—for best picture.
PASSAGES 45

PASSAGES

DIED: Well-known children's author Harriet Stratemeyer Adams, 89, of a heart attack, in Potterville, N.Y. It was Adams' father, Edward Stratemeyer, who originated the Nancy Drew, Hardy Boys and Bobbsey Twins series. Upon his death in 1930, Adams became a senior partner in the Stratemeyer Syndicate, contributing well over 200 books under the pseudonyms Carolyn Keene (Nancy Drew), Franklin W. Dixon (The Hardy Boys) and Laura Lee Hope (The Bobbsey Twins).
Pirates without cutlasses 2021
DATELINE

Pirates without cutlasses

Last fall, an old, rusty freighter was hauled out of drydock and loaded with a cargo of steel valued at $5 million. Under a Greek flag, the ship set sail from Bilbao, Spain, bound for a Persian Gulf port in Iran. But in early November, the ship appeared on Lloyd’s of London’s casualty list, having been suddenly abandoned by its 15-man crew and set adrift in the Red Sea.
A bridge over troubled multicultural waters 5051
BEHAVIOR

A bridge over troubled multicultural waters

The scene is a crowded apartment in the Haitian district of Montreal. Child welfare authorities, alerted by a neighbor who heard screams, are investigating a suspected case of child abuse. The child sits frozen in an apparent trance while agitated relatives explain that he is possessed by an evil spirit which they are attempting to exorcise by a beating.
Yet another assault on the Empire 3031
WORLD

Yet another assault on the Empire

They arrived in the cold hours before dawn last Friday, 4,500 Argentine marines determined to seize and occupy Britain’s Falkland Islands. Initially, world reaction to the invasion of the 200-island South Atlantic archipelago, populated mainly by penguins and 60,000 sheep, ranged from incredulity to hilarity.
The life and the death of the party 22d23
CANADA

The life and the death of the party

The setting for the death of Alberta’s Social Credit party seemed incongruous for a power that had ruled the province for 36 years and captivated whole eras in prairie politics. Still, considering the deaththroe antics that prevailed during the party’s final days, the nondescript boardroom of Edmonton’s Municipal Airport, its walls lined with historical photographs, last week seemed as good a place as any to call it quits.
April 51982 April 191982