November 15, 1982

Beyond the limits of life 5253
COVER

Beyond the limits of life

Four years ago Louise Brown— her picture flickering across millions of TV screens and dominating front pages of newspapers—was the most celebrated baby in the world. Interest was obsessive in the first “test-tube baby,” conceived in a glass laboratory dish from the egg and sperm of her parents, who could not reproduce normally.
Lougheed harvests a bumper crop 2223
CANADA

Lougheed harvests a bumper crop

When Alberta Premier Peter Lougheed took a long autumn stroll near his Edmonton home the morning after his triumphant electoral victory last week, it was an opportunity to savor one of his finest hours and to reflect on the future. After calling an election at the height of a recession in a province darkly clouded by discontent, Lougheed’s decisive win served as political vindication for his decade-long performance as premier.
Trusting his nibs 45
LETTERS

Trusting his nibs

The sight of Trudeau during his threepart address to the nation was indeed pathetic (A Question of Trust, Cover, Nov. 1). Here is the man who, for most of his 14 years in office, has worked on the old tactic of divide and conquer, now asking Canadians to trust.
Revelations from the corridors of power 1213
Q&A: CHRISTINA MCCALL-NEWMAN

Revelations from the corridors of power

With the exception of a brief topple from power in 1979, Pierre Trudeau and his Liberal allies have managed to win elections and wield clout since 1968. Still, the enigmatic prime minister is simply the latest in an almost unbroken line of Liberal “winners”—men who have used and been used by a party that has forged successful alliances of elites throughout the past century.
When half a job is better than none 60j61
LABOR

When half a job is better than none

Jan. 1, 1983, will not only mark a new year for Air Canada pilots but also the start of an innovative battle against unemployment. Last month the company’s nearly 2,000 flyers voted to stop 147 pilot layoffs planned for next year by cutting their hours by five per cent.
Metals that no longer glitter 4243
BUSINESS

Metals that no longer glitter

For nearly three decades trains of the Quebec North Shore and Labrador Railway have snaked their way northward to Schefferville. Filled with squalling children, wives with picnic baskets brimming for the day-long trip and bored miners, the cars enter the region that Samuel de Champlain called “The land God gave to Cain.”
Stamps of approval and disapproval 20d20e
FOLLOW-UP

Stamps of approval and disapproval

Nobody dared throw a pricey party to celebrate the first birthday of the Canada Post Corporation last month. The widely criticized institution was converted into a Crown corporation on Oct. 16, 1981, in a bid to make a modern business out of a government department plagued by labor disruptions and poor service.
The economic inquiry begins 2627
CANADA

The economic inquiry begins

Ian Stewart ended his stormy career as the government’s top economist with a small joke. “Gentlemen, brace yourselves,” said the retiring 51year-old deputy finance minister, “you seem to have a new situation on your hands—a success.” The wry parting comment was, however, a premature assessment of Finance Minister Marc Lalonde’s Oct. 27 minibudget.
A vote of conditional support 3435
WORLD

A vote of conditional support

The 1982 congressional elections have confirmed anew an enduring maxim of political discourse: victory, like beauty, resides in the eye of the beholder. Apparently unmoved by the loss of 26 Republican seats in the House of Representatives and at least seven state governorships, President Ronald Reagan held court serenely in the Rose Garden last week.
The quest for a Sikh state 1617
DATELINE: INDIA

The quest for a Sikh state

The pujari rises at 3 each morning to keep his appointment with God. As the high priest of a Hindu temple in downtown Amritsar in India’s fertile Punjab state, he must visit the shrine to awaken Siva, the god of destruction, by gently ringing bells, chanting and praying.
How multiculturalism corrupts T421
PODIUM

How multiculturalism corrupts

If you are a child of the immigrant experience in Canada, as I am, you will notice some bizarre contradictions about the Canadian Identity. First, some Canadians are more equal than others. On the top rung of our Jacob’s ladder squat those of British Anglo-Saxon stock; on the second rung, the francophone.
November 81982 November 221982